Author: Nicoloso, J.
Paper Title Page
TUB3O04 The LMJ System Sequences Adaptability (French MegaJoule Laser) 1
 
  • Y. Tranquille-Marques, J. Fleury, J. Nicoloso
    CEA, Arpajon, France
 
  The French Atomic and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA : Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives) is currently building the Laser MegaJoule facility. In 2014, the first 8 beams and the target area were commissioned and the first physics campaign (a set of several shots) was achieved. On the LMJ, each shot requires more or less the same operations except for the settings that change from shot to shot. The supervisory controls provide five semi-automated sequence programs to repeat and schedule actions on devices. Three of them are now regularly used to drive the LMJ. Sequence programs need to have different qualities such as flexibility, contextual adaptability, reliability and repeatability. Currently, the calibration shots sequence drives 328 actions towards local control systems. However, this sequence is already dimensioned to drive 22 bundles, which will lead to manage almost 5300 actions. This paper introduces the organization of the control system used by sequence programs, the sequence adjustments files, the grafcets of sequences, the GUIs, the software and different tools used to control the facility.  
slides icon Slides TUB3O04 [11.268 MB]  
 
FRA3O02 The Laser Magajoule Facility: Control System Status Report 1
 
  • J. Nicoloso
    CEA/DAM/DIF, Arpajon, France
 
  The Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) is a 176-beam laser facility, located at the CEA CESTA Laboratory near Bordeaux (France). It is designed to deliver about 1.4 MJ of energy to targets, for high energy density physics experiments, including fusion experiments. The commissioning of the first bundle of 8 beams was achieved in October 2014. Commissioning of next bundles is on the way. The paper gives an overview of the general control system architecture, which is designed around the industrial SCADA PANORAMA, supervising about 500 000 control points, using 250 virtual machines on the high level and hundreds of PCs and PLCs on the low level. The focus is on the rules and development guidelines that allowed smooth integration for all the subsystems delivered by a dozen of different contractors. The integration platform and simulation tools designed to integrate the hardware and software outside the LMJ facility are also described. Having such tools provides the ability of integrating the command control subsystems regardless the co-activity issues encountered on the facility itself. That was the key point for success.