Author: Rees, N.P.
Paper Title Page
MOPGF070 Report on Control/DAQ Software Design and Current State of Implementation for the Percival Detector. 1
 
  • A.S. Palaha, C. Angelsen, Q. Gu, J. Marchal, U.K. Pedersen, N.P. Rees, N. Tartoni, H. Yousef
    DLS, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
  • M. Bayer, J. Correa, P. Gnadt, H. Graafsma, P. Göttlicher, S. Lange, A. Marras, S. Řeža, I. Shevyakov, S. Smoljanin, L. Stebel, C. Wunderer, Q. Xia, M. Zimmer
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
  • G. Cautero, D. Giuressi, A. Khromova, R.H. Menk, G. Pinaroli
    Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Italy
  • D. Das, N. Guerrini, B. Marsh, T.C. Nicholls, I. Sedgwick, R. Turchetta
    STFC/RAL, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon, United Kingdom
  • H.J. Hyun, K.S. Kim, S.Y. Rah
    PAL, Pohang, Kyungbuk, Republic of Korea
 
  The increased brilliance of state-of-the-art Synchrotron radiation sources and Free Electron Lasers require imaging detectors capable of taking advantage of these light source facilities. The PERCIVAL ("Pixelated Energy Resolving CMOS Imager, Versatile and Large") detector is being developed in collaboration between DESY, Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Diamond Light Source and Pohang Accelerator Laboratory. It is a CMOS detector targeting soft X-rays < 1 KeV, with a high resolution of up to 13 M pixels reading out at 120 Hz, producing a challenging data rate of 6 GB/s. The controls and data acquisition system will include a SDK to allow integration with third party control systems like Tango and DOOCS; an EPICS areaDetector driver will be included by default. It will make use of parallel readout to keep pace with the data rate, distributing the data over multiple nodes to create a single virtual dataset using the HDF5 file format for its speed advantages in high volumes of regular data. This paper presents the design of the control system software for the Percival detector, an update of the current state of the implementation carried out by Diamond Light Source.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF070 [0.359 MB]  
 
WEPGF063 Developing HDF5 for the Synchrotron Community 1
 
  • N.P. Rees
    DLS, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
  • H.R. Billich
    PSI, Villigen PSI, Switzerland
  • A. Götz
    ESRF, Grenoble, France
  • Q. Koziol, E. Pourmal
    The HDF Group, Champaign, Illinois, USA
  • M. Rissi
    DECTRIS Ltd., Baden, Switzerland
  • E. Wintersberger
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
 
  HDF5 and NeXus (which normally uses HDF5 as its underlying format) have been widely touted as a standard for storing Photon and Neutron data. They offer many advantages to other common formats and are widely used at many facilities. However, it has been found that the existing implementations of these standards have limited the performance of some recent detector systems. This paper describes how the synchrotron light source community has worked closely with The HDF Group to drive changes to the HDF5 software to make it more suitable for their environment. This includes developments managed by a detector manufacturer (Dectris - for direct chunk writes) as well as synchrotrons (DESY, ESRF and Diamond - for pluggable filters, Single Writer/Multiple Reader and Virtual Data Sets).  
poster icon Poster WEPGF063 [0.718 MB]  
 
THHB3O01 Mapping Developments at Diamond 1
 
  • R.D. Walton, A. Ashton, M. Basham, P. C. Y. Chang, T.M. Cobb, A.J. Dent, J. Filik, M.W. Gerring, C. Mita, C.M. Palmer, U.K. Pedersen, P.D. Quinn, N.P. Rees, S. da Graca
    DLS, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
 
  Many synchrotron beamlines offer some form of continuous scanning for either energy scanning or sample mapping. However, this is normally done on an ad-hoc beamline by beamline basis. Diamond has recently embarked on an ambitious project to define how to implement continuous scanning as the standard way of doing virtually all mapping tasks on beamlines. The project is split into four main areas: 1) User interfaces to describe the mapping process in a scientifically relevant way, generating a scan description that can be used later; 2) The physical process of scanning and coordinating hardware motion and detector data capture across the beamline; 3) Capture of the detector data and all the associated meta-data to disk. Deciding and describing the layout of the file (or files) for the main use cases; 4) Display and analysis of live data and display of processed data. In order to achieve this common approach across beamlines, the standard software used throughout the facility (Delta Tau motor controllers, EPICS, GDA and DAWN), has been built on.  
slides icon Slides THHB3O01 [1.922 MB]  
 
THD3O01
HDF5 and Data Formats Workshop  
 
  • N.P. Rees
    DLS, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
 
  This workshop will provide an introduction to the HDF library and the HDF5 Group, and include discussion on using HDF5 for storage of data and metadata. It will include a presentation about the current and future directions of the HDF5 library by a representative from the HDF Group. Other topics include: - The merits (and otherwise) of various ontologies built on top of HDF5 (e.g. NeXus) - How to use HDF5 in demanding applications (e.g. high speed detectors) - Potential future developments relevant to our community and how we can work to influence them.  
slides icon Slides THD3O01 [0.451 MB]