Author: Van Esch, P.
Paper Title Page
WEPGF083 Single Neutron Counting Using CCD and CMOS Cameras 1
 
  • P. Mutti, M. Plaz, E. Ruiz-Martinez, P. Van Esch
    ILL, Grenoble, France
  • M. Crisanti
    Università degli di Perugia, Perugia, Italy
 
  Neutron detection traditionally takes place with detectors based upon particle detection technologies like gas or scintillation detections. These detectors have a high dynamic range, and are very performing at low counting rates and fast timing (time of flight) applications. At high counting rates however, continuous imaging detectors such as CCD or CMOS camera's optically linked to scintillators, can have very good performances concerning linearity and spatial resolution but the dynamic range of these systems is limited by noise and gamma background. We explore a technique that allows us to use imaging detectors as counting detectors at lower counting rates, and transits smoothly to continuous imaging at higher rates. Neutron detection involves reactions releasing energies of the order of the MeV, while X-ray detection releases energies of the order of the photon energy, (10 KeV range). This 100-fold higher energy allows the individual neutron detection light signal to be significantly above the noise level, as such allowing for discrimination and individual counting. The theory is next confronted with experimental measurements on CCD and CMOS type commercial cameras.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF083 [7.975 MB]  
 
WEPGF084 New Digitisers for Position Sensitive 3He Proportional Counters 1
 
  • P. Mutti, M. Plaz, E. Ruiz-Martinez, P. Van Esch
    ILL, Grenoble, France
 
  3He gas-filled detectors are a classical choice for the detection of thermal and cold neutrons. The incident neutrons are captured by the 3He producing a tritium and an hydrogen which are sharing the 765 keV of energy generated in the reaction. The classical geometry of a charge-division neutron detector consists of a cylindrical volume housing a resistive anode. Electrical signals are extracted at both ends of the tube and the information about the interaction point along the tube can be derived from the ratio of the collected charged at both ends. The classical analog approach for the charge readout consists of a shaping amplifier coupled with a peak sensing ADC. The development of a new digital front-end electronics based on 64 channels, 62.5 Msample/s and 12 bit digitisers, is reported on. Excellent results have been obtained in terms of position resolution and signal to noise ratio when adopting a continuous digital filtering and gaussian shaping.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF084 [8.285 MB]