Keyword: diagnostics
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MOD3O03 Shot Rate Improvement Strive for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) alignment, laser, controls, target 1
 
  • G.K. Brunton, G.A. Bowers, A.D. Conder, J.-M.G. Di Nicola, P. Di Nicola, M.A. Fedorov, B.T. Fishler, R. Fleming, D.H. Kalantar, G. Lau, D.G. Mathisen, V.J. Miller Kamm, V. Pacheu, M. Paul, R.K. Reed, J. Rouse, R.J. Sanchez, M.J. Shaw, E.A. Stout, S. Weaver, E.F. Wilson
    LLNL, Livermore, California, USA
 
  Funding: This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.
The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental facility with 192 beams capable of delivering 1.8 megajoules of 500-terawatt ultraviolet laser energy. The energy, temperatures and pressures capable of being generated allow scientists the ability to generate conditions similar to the center of the sun and explore physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes and thermonuclear burn. NIF has transitioned to a 24x7 operational facility and in the past year significant focus has been placed on increasing the volume of experimental shots capable of being conducted so as to satisfy the demand from the wide range of user groups. The goal for the current fiscal year is a shot rate of 300 (> 50% increase over the previous year), increasing to a sustainable rate of 400 the year after. The primary focus areas to achieve these increases are; making more shot time available, improvements in experiment scheduling, and reducing the duration of a shot cycle. This paper will discuss the control system improvements implemented and planned to reduce the shot cycle duration and the systematic approaches taken to identify and prioritize them.
 
slides icon Slides MOD3O03 [3.415 MB]  
 
MOM310 Nonlinear System Identification of Superconducting Magnets of RHIC at BNL superconducting-magnet, real-time, dipole, database 1
 
  • P. Chitnis
    Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, USA
  • K.A. Brown
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy.
The Quench Detection System (QDS) of RHIC detects the Superconducting (SC) magnet quenches by voltage sensing. The real-time voltage across the SC magnet is compared with a predicted voltage from a behavioral model, a deviation from which triggers the quench event and energy extraction. Due to the limitations of the magnet model, many false quench events are generated that affect the RHIC availability. This work is targeted towards remodeling the magnets through nonlinear system identification for the improvement in QDS reliability. The nonlinear electrical behavior of the SC magnets is investigated by statistical data analysis of magnet current and voltage signals. Many data cleaning techniques are employed to reduce the noise in the observed data. Piecewise regression has been used to examine the saturation effects in magnet inductance. The goodness-of-fit of the model is assessed by field testing and comprehensive residual analysis. Finally a new model is suggested for the magnets to be implemented for more accurate results.
 
slides icon Slides MOM310 [0.822 MB]  
poster icon Poster MOM310 [1.028 MB]  
 
MOPGF045 MEBT and D-Plate Control System Status of the Linear IFMIF Prototype Accelerator controls, EPICS, quadrupole, operation 1
 
  • J. Calvo, D. Jimenez-Rey, E. Molina Marinas, J. Molla, I. Podadera
    CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain
 
  Funding: This work has been partially funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, under projects OPTIMHAC FIS2013-40860-R and IFMIF-EVEDA II. Ref: AIC-A-2011-0654.
Linear IFMIF* Prototype Accelerator (LIPAc), Rokkasho, Japan, comprises a succession of devices and systems that accelerate a deuteron beam up to 9 MeV with a current of 125 mA, generating a power of 1.125 MW, and transport it up to a beam dump. The beam power becomes critical from the point of view of losses; even tiny losses must be avoided. This fact, and the complexity of the accelerator operation, requires a coherent strategy when designing, commissioning and optimizing the accelerator control system, specifically focused in the control systems of the Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) and the Diagnostic Plate (DP, a movable set of diagnostics). Both systems are essential to validate the performance of the accelerator and particularly the ion source, Radio Frequency (RF) and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) systems. This contribution will describe the recent advances in the control architectures and the EPICS based developments achieved in MEBT for the motion control of bunchers and scrapers, control of the power supplies in quadrupoles and steerers, and refrigeration and vacuum. Besides, control of fluorescence profile monitors (FPMs) in the D-Plate is displayed.
*IFMIF, the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility, is an accelerator-based neutron source that will use Li (d, xn) reactions to generate a flux of neutrons with a broad peak at 14 MeV.
 
poster icon Poster MOPGF045 [1.333 MB]  
 
MOPGF126 A Modified Functional Safety Method for Predicting False Beam Trips and Blind Failures in the Design Phase of the ESS Beam Interlock System proton, hardware, operation, interface 1
 
  • R. Andersson, E. Bargalló, A. Monera Martinez, A. Nordt
    ESS, Lund, Sweden
 
  As accelerators are becoming increasingly powerful, the requirement of a reliable machine protection system is apparent to avoid beam-induced damage to the equipment. A missed detection of a hazard is undesirable as it could lead to equipment damage on very short time scales. In addition, the number of false beam trips, leading to unnecessary downtime, should be kept at a minimum to achieve user satisfaction. This paper describes a method for predicting and mitigating these faults, based on the architecture of the system. The method is greatly influenced by the IEC61508 standard for functional safety for the industry and implements a Failure Mode, Effects, and Diagnostics Analysis (FMEDA). It is suggested that this method is applied at an early stage in the design phase of a high-power accelerator, so that possible protection and mitigation can be suggested and implemented in the interlock system logic. The method described in this paper is currently applied at the European Spallation Source and the results follow from the analysis on the Beam Interlock System of this facility.  
 
TUD3I01 The LMJ Target Diagnostics Control System Architecture TANGO, controls, target, interface 1
 
  • S. Perez, T. Caillaud
    CEA, Arpajon, France
 
  The French Laser Megajoule (LMJ) is, behind the US NIF, the second largest inertial fusion facility in the World. The main activity of this facility is the acquisition of several physical phenomena as neutron, gamma, X rays…produced by the indirect attack of hundreds of high power laser beams on targets through measurement devices called "target diagnostics". More than 30 diagnostics will be installed and driven in a huge and complex integrated computer control system. The aim of this paper is to describe an architecture based on the Tango open source software for the very low level control system, Python language for the development of drivers and the French commercial PANORAMA software as the main high level SCADA. This choice leads to guaranty the evolution of the middleware software architecture of this facility supposed to be operated during dozen of years with the capability of using many instruments including sustainability.  
slides icon Slides TUD3I01 [29.535 MB]  
 
WEPGF062 Processing High-Bandwidth Bunch-by-Bunch Observation Data from the RF and Transverse Damper Systems of the LHC framework, Linux, software, controls 1
 
  • M. Ojeda Sandonís, P. Baudrenghien, A.C. Butterworth, J. Galindo, W. Höfle, T.E. Levens, J.C. Molendijk, D. Valuch
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • F. Vaga
    University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy
 
  The radiofrequency and transverse damper feedback systems of the Large Hadron Collider digitize beam phase and position measurements at the bunch repetition rate of 40 MHz. Embedded memory buffers allow a few milliseconds of full rate bunch-by-bunch data to be retrieved over the VME bus for diagnostic purposes, but experience during LHC Run I has shown that for beam studies much longer data records are desirable. A new "observation box" diagnostic system is being developed which parasitically captures data streamed directly out of the feedback hardware into a Linux server through an optical fiber link, and permits processing and buffering of full rate data for around one minute. The system will be connected to an LHC-wide trigger network for detection of beam instabilities, which allows efficient capture of signals from the onset of beam instability events. The data will be made available for analysis by client applications through interfaces which are exposed as standard equipment devices within CERN's controls framework. It is also foreseen to perform online Fourier analysis of transverse position data inside the observation box using GPUs with the aim of extracting betatron tune signals.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF062 [4.408 MB]  
 
WEPGF155 Improving Software Services Through Diagnostic and Monitoring Capabilities controls, software, monitoring, operation 1
 
  • P. Charrue, M. Buttner, F. Ehm, P. Jurcso
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  CERN's Accelerator Controls System is built upon a large set of software services which are vital for daily operations. It is important to instrument these services with sufficient diagnostic and monitoring capabilities to reduce the time to locate a problem and to enable pre-failure detection by surveillance of process internal information. The main challenges here are the diversity of programs (C/C++ and Java) , real-time constraints, the distributed environment and diskless systems. This paper describes which building blocks have been developed to collect process metrics and logs, software deployment and release information and how equipment/software experts today have simple and time-saving access to them using the DIAMON console. This includes the possibility to remotely inspect the process (build-time, version, start time, counters,..) and change its log levels for more detailed information.  
 
THHA3O02 Status of the Continuous Mode Scan for Undulator Beamlines at BESSY II undulator, controls, feedback, EPICS 1
 
  • A.F. Balzer, E. Schierle, E. Suljoti, M. Witt
    HZB, Berlin, Germany
  • R. Follath
    Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Italy
 
  At the synchrotron light source BESSY II monochromator (MONO) and insertion device (ID) scans can be done synchronized in two different modes. In step mode MONO and ID move independently to intermediate target positions of an energy scan. In continuous mode (CM) MONO and ID cover the whole range of the scan nonstop in a coupled motion. Data acquisition is done continuously at the speed provided by the CM scan and is available in regular user operation. Currently CM is in operation at 11 undulator beamlines at BESSY II. 3 new beamlines requesting CM are under construction. During CM the MONO EPICS IOC acts as a controller forcing the MONO optics to follow the movement of the ID. A non-linear predictive control scheme is used to implement this dynamic coupling. The controller task utilizes polynomial regression to extrapolate the ID motion. Calculation of the trajectories for MONO grating and mirror is based on bijective gap to energy lookup tables and the grating equation. In this paper the technical implementation, limitations, recently developed diagnostic methods, and future plans for improvements are presented.  
slides icon Slides THHA3O02 [0.898 MB]  
 
THHD3O05 Standards-Based Open-Source PLC Diagnostics Monitoring PLC, monitoring, status, controls 1
 
  • B. Copy, H. Milcent, M.Z. Zimny
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  PLCs are widely used to control and monitor industrial processes at CERN. Since these PLCs fulfill critical functions, they must be placed under permanent monitoring. However, due to their proprietary architecture, it is difficult to both monitor the status of these PLCs using vendor-provided software packages and integrate the resulting data with the CERN accelerator infrastructure, which itself relies on CERN-specific protocols. This paper describes the architecture of a stand-alone "PLC diagnostics monitoring" Linux daemon which provides live diagnostics information through standard means and protocols (file logging, CERN protocols, Java Monitoring Extensions). This information is currently consumed by the supervision software which is used by the standby service to monitor the status of critical industrial applications in the LHC and by the monitoring console used by the LHC operators. Both applications are intensively used to monitor and diagnose critical PLC hardware running all over CERN.  
slides icon Slides THHD3O05 [1.053 MB]  
 
FRA3O02 The Laser Magajoule Facility: Control System Status Report controls, laser, target, interface 1
 
  • J. Nicoloso
    CEA/DAM/DIF, Arpajon, France
 
  The Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) is a 176-beam laser facility, located at the CEA CESTA Laboratory near Bordeaux (France). It is designed to deliver about 1.4 MJ of energy to targets, for high energy density physics experiments, including fusion experiments. The commissioning of the first bundle of 8 beams was achieved in October 2014. Commissioning of next bundles is on the way. The paper gives an overview of the general control system architecture, which is designed around the industrial SCADA PANORAMA, supervising about 500 000 control points, using 250 virtual machines on the high level and hundreds of PCs and PLCs on the low level. The focus is on the rules and development guidelines that allowed smooth integration for all the subsystems delivered by a dozen of different contractors. The integration platform and simulation tools designed to integrate the hardware and software outside the LMJ facility are also described. Having such tools provides the ability of integrating the command control subsystems regardless the co-activity issues encountered on the facility itself. That was the key point for success.