Keyword: electron
Paper Title Other Keywords Page
MOC3O03 Automatic FEL Optimization at FERMI FEL, laser, feedback, undulator 1
 
  • G. Gaio, M. Lonza
    Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Italy
 
  FERMI is a seeded Free Electron Laser (FEL) located in Trieste, Italy. The machine setup and optimization is a non-trivial problem due to the high sensitivity of the FEL process to several machine parameters. In particular, the electron bunch trajectory and its spatial overlap with the seed laser beam represent one of the key aspects to optimize and then preserve during machine operation. In order to ease the FEL tuning and to guarantee a long term stability of the photon beam, a software process integrated into the feedback systems performs automatic trajectory optimization of both the seed laser and the electron beams. The algorithm implementation, the results and the operational issues are presented.  
slides icon Slides MOC3O03 [8.957 MB]  
 
MOM305 Control System for a Dedicated Accelerator for SACLA Wide-Band Beam Line controls, operation, experiment, database 1
 
  • N. Hosoda, T. Fukui
    RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Innovative Light Sources Division, Hyogo, Japan
  • M. Ishii
    JASRI/SPring-8, Hyogo-ken, Japan
  • T. Ohshima, T. Sakurai, H. Takebe
    RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo, Japan
 
  This paper report about a control system for a dedicated accelerator for SACLA wide-band beam line (BL1), requirements, construction strategies, and present status. At the upgrade plan of SACLA BL1, it was decided to move SCSS test accelerator, which operated from 2005 to 2013, to the upstream of the BL1 in the undulator hall. The control system of the accelerator had to be operated seamlessly with SACLA, to reuse old components as much as possible, and to avoid stopping SACLA user experiments during the start up. The system was constructed with MADOCA which is already used at SACLA. In the control components, VME optical DIO cards and chassis for magnet power supplies were reused after cleaning and checking that there was no degradation of quality. The RF conditioning of the accelerator was started in in October 2014, while SACLA user experiments were going on. A data collection system was prepared, myCC, having a MADOCA compatible interface and an independent database from SACLA. It enabled efficient start up and after enough debugging, the data collection was successfully merged to SACLA in January 2015. Beam commissioning of the accelerator is planned for autumn 2015.  
slides icon Slides MOM305 [0.964 MB]  
poster icon Poster MOM305 [0.363 MB]  
 
MOM306 Status of the PAL-XFEL Control System controls, network, undulator, timing 1
 
  • C. Kim, S.Y. Baek, H.-S. Kang, J.H. Kim, K.W. Kim, I.S. Ko, G. Mun, B.R. Park
    PAL, Pohang, Kyungbuk, Republic of Korea
 
  Pohang accelerator laboratory (PAL) started an x-ray free electron laser project (PAL-XFEL) in 2011. In the PAL-XFEL, an electron beam with 200 pC will be generated from a photocathode RF gun and will be accelerated to 10 GeV by using a linear accelerator. The electron beam will pass through undulator section to produce hard x-ray radiation. In 2015, we will finish the installation and will start a commissioning of the PAL-XFEL. In this paper, we introduce the PAL-XFEL and explain present status of it. Details of the control system will be described including a network system, a timing system, hardware control systems and a machine interlock system.  
slides icon Slides MOM306 [1.838 MB]  
 
MOPGF026 Laser Beam Profiling and Further Improvements to the FHI FEL FEL, laser, detector, cavity 1
 
  • H. Junkes, W. Schöllkopf, M. Wesemann
    FHI, Berlin, Germany
 
  A mid-infrared FEL has been established at the Fritz-Haber-Institut in Berlin. It is used for spectroscopic investigations of molecules, clusters, nanoparticles and surfaces. The oscillator FEL is operated with 15 - 50 MeV electrons from a normal-conducting S-band linac equipped with a gridded thermionic gun and a chicane for controlled bunch compression. The EPICS software framework was choosen to build the control system for this facility. In an effort to support the various experimenters two different Laser Beam Profiling cameras have been integrated. Here, the areadetector framework with genicam integration is used. The control system was also expanded with fast digitizers (SIS3316) but connected via Ethernet instead of using a VMEbus crate controller to get a higher flexibility. A iPad app for monitoring completes the enhancement. This paper presents design and implementation aspects of the upgrade, its capabilities, and lessons learned during the development.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF026 [15.827 MB]  
 
MOPGF032 Installation of a Hot-Swappable Spare Injector Laser System for the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source laser, controls, timing, cathode 1
 
  • S.C. Alverson, G.W. Brown, F.-J. Decker, S. Gilevich, S. Vetter
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
 
  LCLS is a facility for generation of very short duration, highly intense x-ray pulses which requires an extremely reliable photocathode electron source. In order to maintain high up-time (>95%) for the experimenters, operations rely on a maintenance program for active laser components as well as on built-in redundancy in case of failure. To accomplish this, a duplicate laser system was installed, allowing for quick swap between the active system and the spare in the event of a malfunction or for planned maintenance. As an added bonus, this redundant system provides additional possibilities for science as both laser systems can also be run to the cathode simultaneously to create multiple particle bunches. Diagnostics were put in place to maintain both special and temporal overlap and allow for the fast switching between systems by operations personnel while still remaining within the safety envelope. This was done for both the primary UV drive laser as well as the secondary IR "heater" laser. This paper describes the installation challenges and design architecture for this backup laser system.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF032 [1.773 MB]  
 
MOPGF049 100Hz Data Acquisition in the TANGO Control System at the Max IV Linac TANGO, hardware, controls, linac 1
 
  • P.J. Bell, V.H. Hardion, V. Michel
    MAX-lab, Lund, Sweden
 
  The MAX IV synchrotron radiation facility is currently being constructed in Lund, Sweden. A linear accelerator serves as the injector for the two storage rings and also as the source of short X ray pulses, in which mode it will operate with a 100Hz repetition rate. The controls system, based on TANGO, is required to collect and archive data from several different types of hardware at up to this 100Hz frequency. These data are used for example in offline beam diagnostics, for which they must be associated to a unique electron bunch number. To meet these requirements, the timing performance of the hardware components have been studied, and a TANGO Fast Archiver device created. The system is currently in the deployment phase and will play an important role in allowing the linac and Short Pulse Facility reach their 100Hz design goal  
poster icon Poster MOPGF049 [17.953 MB]  
 
MOPGF066 Synchronized Ramping of Magnet Power Supplies for Streamlined Operation at Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and Electron Lens (e-Lens) solenoid, software, operation, controls 1
 
  • P. K. Kankiya, J.P. Jamilkowski, T. Samms
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy.
Synchronous ramping of an assembly of magnets is critical for operation of beam in an accelerator. Magnet currents must remain within the operational limits to avoid dis-alignment of electron beam. In order to comply with the design specifications of ERL and ELENS project , two different software control mechanisms have been developed. The ramp profile is automated and maintained by tracking current in all dipole magnets at ERL and superconducting solenoid magnets at ELENS. This mechanism speeds up operations and adds a level of protection. The purpose of this application is to reduce unnecessary interlocks of the personnel protection system. This paper will describe the power supply arrangement, communication mechanism and the state machine algorithm used for feedback and control. A report on operating experience will be presented.
 
poster icon Poster MOPGF066 [1.966 MB]  
 
MOPGF093 Real-time Beam Loading Compensation for Single SRF Cavity LLRF Regulation LLRF, real-time, cavity, detector 1
 
  • I. Rutkowski, M. Grzegrzólka
    Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Electronic Systems, Warsaw, Poland
  • Ł. Butkowski, Ch. Schmidt
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
  • M. Kuntzsch
    HZDR, Dresden, Germany
 
  Stable and reproducible generation of a photon beam at Free Electron Lasers (FELs) necessitates a low energy spread of the electron beam. A low level radio frequency (LLRF) control system stabilizes the RF field inside accelerating modules. An electron beam passing through the cavity induces a drop in the actual stored field proportional to the charge, the cavity shunt impedance, and the bunch repetition rate. The feedback loop compensates for the perturbation after the accelerating gradient drops. Due to the digital loop delay and limited bandwidth of the closed loop system, this disturbance induces control errors which can increase beam energy spread. An open-loop controller uses information obtained from the beam diagnostic systems accounting in real-time for fluctuations of the beam current. This paper describes the bunch charge detection scheme, its implementation, as well as results of the tests performed on the ELBE (Electron Linac for beams with high Brilliance and low Emittance) radiation source at the HZDR (Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf) facility.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF093 [4.046 MB]  
 
MOPGF101 High Level Controls for the European XFEL controls, interface, software, free-electron-laser 1
 
  • L. Fröhlich, B. Beutner, W. Decking, O. Hensler, R. Kammering, T. Limberg, S.M. Meykopff, J. Wilgen
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
 
  The European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) will generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes from the electron beam of a 2.1 km long superconducting linear accelerator. Due to the complexity of the facility and the sheer number of subsystems and components, special emphasis needs to be placed on the automatization of procedures, on the abstraction of machine parameters, and on the development of user-friendly high-level software for the operation of the accelerator. This paper gives an overview of the ongoing work and highlights several new tools and concepts.  
 
MOPGF145 Commissioning and Design of the Machine Protection System for Fermilab's Fast Facility status, controls, interface, laser 1
 
  • L.R. Carmichael, D.J. Crawford, N. Liu, R. Neswold, A. Warner, J.Y. Wu
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
 
  The Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) Facility will provide an electron beam with up to 3000 bunches per macro-pulse, 5Hz repetition rate and 300 MeV beam energy. The completed machine will be capable of sustaining an average electron beam power of close to 15KW at the bunch charge of 3.2nC. A robust Machine Protection System (MPS) capable of interrupting the beam within a macro-pulse and that interfaces well with new and existing controls system infrastructure has been developed to mitigate and analyze faults related to this relatively high damage potential. This paper describes the component layers of the MPS system, including a FPGA-based Permit Generator and Laser Pulse Controller, the Beam Loss Monitoring system design as well as the controls and related work done to date.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF145 [1.844 MB]  
 
MOPGF155 Design and Status for the Electron Lens Project at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider software, interface, operation, controls 1
 
  • J.P. Jamilkowski, Z. Altinbas, M.R. Costanzo, T. D'Ottavio, X. Gu, M. Harvey, P. K. Kankiya, R.J. Michnoff, T.A. Miller, S. Nemesure, T.C. Shrey
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy.
The Electron Lens upgrade project at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has reached an operational status, whereby intense, pulsed or DC beams of electrons are generated in order to interact with the RHIC polarized proton beams in both the Blue and Yellow Rings at the 10 o'clock Interaction Region. Interactions between the electrons and protons are utilized to counteract the beam-beam effect that arises from the desired polarized proton collisions, which result in a higher RHIC luminosity. A complex system for operating the e-lens has been developed, including superconducting and non-superconducting magnet controls, instrumentation systems, a COTS-based Machine Protection System, custom Blue and Yellow e-lens timing systems for synchronizing the electron beam with the RHIC timing system, beam alignment software tools for maximizing electron-proton collisions, as well as complex user interfaces to support routine operation of the system. e-lens software and hardware design will be presented, as well as recent updates to the system that were required in order to meet changing system requirements in preparation for the first operational run of the system.
 
poster icon Poster MOPGF155 [1.826 MB]  
 
MOPGF162 MaRIE - Instrumentation & Control System Design Status and Options controls, linac, undulator, proton 1
 
  • M. Pieck, R.W. Garnett, F.E. Shelley, B.G. Smith
    LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract W-7405-ENG-36. LA-UR-15-27877
Los Alamos National Laboratory has defined a new signature science facility, Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) that builds on the existing capabilities of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). It will be the first multi-probe materials research center to combine high-energy, high-repetition-rate, coherent x-rays with electron and proton-beam charged-particle imaging to perform in-situ measurements of a sample in extreme environments. At its core, a 42-keV XFEL will be coupled with the LANSCE MW proton accelerator. A pre-conceptual design for MaRIE has been established. Technical risk reduction for the project includes an injector test-stand that is currently being designed. New accelerators are either planned, under construction, or currently in operation around the world, providing opportunities for the MaRIE project to leverage the instrumentation & controls (I&C) efforts of these facilities to minimize non-recurring engineering costs. This paper discusses possible MaRIE I&C system implementation choices and trade-offs, and also provides an overview of the proposed MaRIE facilities and the current design.
 
poster icon Poster MOPGF162 [0.399 MB]  
 
MOPGF175 A Unified Approach to the Design of Orbit Feedback with Fast and Slow Correctors controls, storage-ring, simulation, feedback 1
 
  • S. Gayadeen, M.T. Heron, G. Rehm
    DLS, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
 
  A unified control design is proposed to simultaneously determine control actions for both fast and slow arrays of correctors used for orbit feedback. By determining the interaction of the spatial subspaces of each array of correctors, spatial modes which require both fast and slow correctors can be identified. For these modes, a mid-ranging control technique is proposed to systematically allocate control action for each corrector. The mid-ranging control technique exploits the different dynamic characteristics of the correctors to ensure that the two arrays of actuators work together and avoid saturation of the fast correctors. Simulation results for the Diamond Storage Ring are presented.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF175 [0.995 MB]  
 
MOPGF177 Robust Stability Analysis of Orbit Feedback Controllers controls, feedback 1
 
  • S. Gayadeen, M.T. Heron, G. Rehm
    DLS, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
 
  Closed loop stability of electron orbit feedback controllers is affected by mismatches between the accelerator model and the real machine. In this paper, the small gain theorem is used to express analytical criteria for closed loop stability in the presence of spatial uncertainty. It is also demonstrated how the structure of the uncertainty models affects the conservativeness of the robust stability results. The robust stability criteria are applied to the Diamond Light Source electron orbit controller and bounds on the allowable size of spatial uncertainties which guarantee closed loop stability is determined.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF177 [1.023 MB]  
 
MOPGF178 Uncertainty Modelling of Response Matrix controls, storage-ring, feedback, closed-orbit 1
 
  • S. Gayadeen, M.T. Heron, G. Rehm
    DLS, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
 
  Electron orbit feedback controllers are based on the inversion of the response matrix of the storage ring and as a result, mismatches between the accelerator model and the real machine can limit controller performance or cause the controller to become unstable. In order to perform stability analysis tests of the controller, accurate uncertainty descriptions are required. In this paper, BPM scaling errors, actuator scaling errors and drifts in tune are considered as the main sources of spatial uncertainties and because most electron orbit feedback systems use Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) to decouple the inputs and outputs of the system, the uncertainty can be expressed in terms of this decomposition. However SVD does not allow the main sources of uncertainty to be decoupled so instead, a Fourier-based decomposition of the response matrix is used to decouple and model the uncertainties. In this paper, both Fourier and SVD uncertainty modelling methods are applied to the Diamond Light Source storage ring and compared.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF178 [1.465 MB]  
 
WEPGF006 Magnet Server and Control System Database Infrastructure for the European XFEL power-supply, database, controls, quadrupole 1
 
  • L. Fröhlich, P.K. Bartkiewicz, M. Walla
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
 
  The linear accelerator of the European XFEL will use more than 1400 individually powered electromagnets for beam guidance and focusing. Front-end servers establish the low-level interface to several types of power supplies, and a middle layer server provides control over physical parameters like field or deflection angle in consideration of the hysteresis curve of the magnet. A relational database system with stringent consistency checks is used to store configuration data. The paper focuses on the functionality and architecture of the middle layer server and gives an overview of the database infrastructure.  
 
WEPGF029 High Level Software Structure for the European XFEL LLRF System LLRF, controls, FPGA, software 1
 
  • Ch. Schmidt, V. Ayvazyan, J. Branlard, L. Butkowski, O. Hensler, M. Killenberg, M. Omet, S. Pfeiffer, K.P. Przygoda, H. Schlarb
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
  • W. Cichalewski, F. Makowski
    TUL-DMCS, Łódź, Poland
  • A. Piotrowski
    FastLogic Sp. z o.o., Łódź, Poland
 
  The Low level RF system for the European XFEL is controlling the accelerating RF fields in order to meet the specifications of the electron bunch parameters. A hardware platform based on the MicroTCA.4 standard has been chosen, to realize a reliable, remotely maintainable and high performing integrated system. Fast data transfer and processing is done by field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) within the crate, controlled by a CPU via PCIe communication. In addition to the MTCA system, the LLRF comprises external supporting modules also requiring control and monitoring software. In this paper the LLRF system high level software used in E-XFEL is presented. It is implemented as a semi-distributed architecture of front end server instances in combination with direct FPGA communication using fast optical links. Miscellaneous server tasks have to be executed, e.g. fast data acquisition and distribution, adaptation algorithms and updating controller parameters. Furthermore the inter-server data communication and integration within the control system environment as well as the interface to other subsystems are described.  
 
WEPGF037 Data Lifecycle in Large Experimental Physics Facilities: The Approach of the Synchrotron ELETTRA and the Free Electron Laser FERMI operation, experiment, data-analysis, synchrotron 1
 
  • F. Billè, R. Borghes, F. Brun, V. Chenda, A. Curri, V. Duic, D. Favretto, G. Kourousias, M. Lonza, M. Prica, R. Pugliese, M. Scarcia, M. Turcinovich
    Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Italy
 
  Often the producers of Big Data face the emerging problem of Data Deluge. Nevertheless experimental facilities such as synchrotrons and free electron lasers may have additional requirements, mostly related to the necessity of managing the access for thousands of scientists. A complete data lifecycle describes the seamless path that joins distinct IT tasks such as experiment proposal management, user accounts, data acquisition and analysis, archiving, cataloguing and remote access. This paper presents the data lifecycle of the synchrotron ELETTRA and the free electron laser FERMI. With the focus on data access, the Virtual Unified Office (VUO) is presented. It is a core element in scientific proposal management, user information DB, scientific data oversight and remote access. Eventually are discussed recent developments of the beamline software, that holds the key role to data and metadata acquisition but also requires integration with the rest of the system components in order to provide data cataloging, data archiving and remote access. The scope of this paper is to disseminate the current status of a complete data lifecycle, discuss key issues and hint on the future directions.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF037 [1.110 MB]  
 
WEPGF038 A Flexible System for End-User Data Visualisation, Analysis Prototyping and Experiment Logbook controls, data-acquisition, laser, free-electron-laser 1
 
  • R. Borghes, V. Chenda, G. Kourousias, M. Lonza, M. Prica, M. Scarcia
    Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Italy
 
  Experimental facilities like synchrotrons and free electron lasers, often aim at well defined data workflows tightly integrated with their control systems. Still such facilities are also service providers to visiting scientists. The hosted researchers often have requirements different than those present in the established processes. The most evident needs are those for i) flexible experimental data visualisation, ii) rapid prototyping of analysis methods, and iii) electronic logbook services. This paper reports on the development of a software system, collectively referred to as DonkiTools, that aims at satisfying the aforementioned needs for the synchrotron ELETTRA and the free electron laser FERMI. The design strategy is outlined and includes topics regarding: dynamic data visualisation, Python scripting of analysis methods, integration with the TANGO distributed control system, electronic logbook with automated metadata reporting, usability, customization, and extensibility. Finally a use case presents a full deployment of the system, integrated with the FermiDAQ data collection system, in the free electron laser beamline EIS-TIMEX.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF038 [1.011 MB]  
 
WEPGF083 Single Neutron Counting Using CCD and CMOS Cameras neutron, detector, simulation, background 1
 
  • P. Mutti, M. Plaz, E. Ruiz-Martinez, P. Van Esch
    ILL, Grenoble, France
  • M. Crisanti
    Università degli di Perugia, Perugia, Italy
 
  Neutron detection traditionally takes place with detectors based upon particle detection technologies like gas or scintillation detections. These detectors have a high dynamic range, and are very performing at low counting rates and fast timing (time of flight) applications. At high counting rates however, continuous imaging detectors such as CCD or CMOS camera's optically linked to scintillators, can have very good performances concerning linearity and spatial resolution but the dynamic range of these systems is limited by noise and gamma background. We explore a technique that allows us to use imaging detectors as counting detectors at lower counting rates, and transits smoothly to continuous imaging at higher rates. Neutron detection involves reactions releasing energies of the order of the MeV, while X-ray detection releases energies of the order of the photon energy, (10 KeV range). This 100-fold higher energy allows the individual neutron detection light signal to be significantly above the noise level, as such allowing for discrimination and individual counting. The theory is next confronted with experimental measurements on CCD and CMOS type commercial cameras.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF083 [7.975 MB]  
 
WEPGF128 Development Status of the Sirius Timing System timing, injection, storage-ring, linac 1
 
  • J.L.N. Brito, S.R. Marques, L.A. Martins, D.O. Tavares
    LNLS, Campinas, Brazil
 
  Sirius is a new low-emittance 3 GeV synchrotron light source under construction in Brazil by LNLS, scheduled for commissioning in 2018. Its timing system will be responsible for providing low jitter synchronized signals for the beam injection process as well as reference clocks and triggers for diverse subsystems such as electron BPMs, fast orbit feedback and beamlines distributed around the 518 meters circumference of the storage ring, Booster and Linac. It will be composed of Ethernet-configured standalone event generators and event receivers modules developed by SINAP through a collaboration with LNLS. The modules will be controlled by remote EPICS soft IOCs. This paper presents the system structure and the status of the development, some options for integrating it to the Sirius BPM MicroTCA platform are also discussed.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF128 [13.921 MB]