Keyword: GUI
Paper Title Other Keywords Page
MOB3O03 MAX IV Laboratory, Milestones and Lessons Learned controls, TANGO, software, hardware 1
 
  • V.H. Hardion, Y. Cerenius, F. H. Hennies, K. Larsson, J. Lidón-Simon, M. Sjöström, D.P. Spruce
    MAX-lab, Lund, Sweden
 
  The MAX IV Laboratory is a new scientific research facility based on synchrotron light being built at Lund University, southern Sweden. The accelerator consists of one full energy linear accelerator providing two storage rings at 1.5 GeV & 3 GeV and a Short Pulse Facility. Additionally more than 13 beamlines are planned to be built among which should be operational for the first users in 2016. The current status and approach of the control system is presented from its technical and organisational point of view, including the stakeholders, as well as the lessons learned from the commissioning as part of our continuous improvement for the future.  
slides icon Slides MOB3O03 [19.077 MB]  
 
MOPGF006 The Renovation of the CERN Controls Configuration Service controls, database, software, factory 1
 
  • L. Burdzanowski, C. Roderick
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  The Controls Configuration Service (CCS) is a key component in CERN's data driven accelerator Control System.  Based around a central database, the service also provides a range of client APIs and user interfaces - enabling configuration of controls for CERN's accelerator complex.  The service has existed for 35 years (29 based on Oracle DBMS). There has been substantial evolution of the CCS over time to cater for changing requirements and technology advances.  Inevitably this has led to increases in CCS complexity and an accumulation of technical debt.  These two aspects combined have a negative impact on the flexibility and maintainability of the CCS, leading to a potential bottleneck for Control System evolution.   This paper describes on-going renovation efforts (started mid-2014) to tackle the aforementioned issues, whilst ensuring overall system stability.  In particular, this paper covers architectural changes, the agile development process in place - bringing users close to the development cycle, and the deterministic approach used to treat technical debt.  Collectively these efforts are leading towards a successful renovation of a core element of the Control System.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF006 [4.508 MB]  
 
MOPGF048 IBEX - the New EPICS Based Instrument Control System at the ISIS Pulsed Neutron and Muon Source controls, EPICS, experiment, LabView 1
 
  • F.A. Akeroyd, K. V. L. Baker, M.J. Clarke, G.D. Howells, D.P. Keymer, K.J. Knowles, C. Moreton-Smith, D.E. Oram
    STFC/RAL/ISIS, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon, United Kingdom
  • M. Bell, I.A. Bush, R.F. Nelson, K. Ward, K. Woods
    Tessella, Abingdon, United Kingdom
 
  Instrument control at ISIS is in the process of migrating from a mainly locally developed system to an EPICS based system. The new control system, called IBEX, was initially used during commissioning of a new instrument prior to a long maintenance shutdown. This first usage has provided valuable feedback and significant progress has been made on enhancing the system during the facility maintenance period in preparation for the move onto production use. Areas that will be of particular interest to scientists in the future will be linking feedback from live data analysis with instrument control and also providing a simple and powerful scripting interface for facility users. In this paper we will cover the architecture and design of the new control system, our choices of technologies, how the system has evolved following initial use, and our plans for moving forward.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF048 [0.713 MB]  
 
MOPGF065 Motion Control on the Max IV Soft X-Ray Beamlines With Tango and Sardana controls, TANGO, synchrotron, interface 1
 
  • M. Lindberg, J. Forsberg, L. Kjellsson, A.M. Milan, C. Sathe, P. Sjöblom, S. Urpelainen
    MAX-lab, Lund, Sweden
 
  MAX IV Laboratory, a synchrotron facility in Lund, has selected TANGO as the control system framework for the entire facility. On the beamlines that are being built the Python-based SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition) system Sardana will be used for experimental control. SPECIES, one out of eight new soft X-ray beamlines, is used as a test bench for evaluating the chosen standards. Sardana is used to control the energy setting of the PGM (plane grating monochromator) as well as to provide macros and other utilities for the user. Generic Taurus GUIs and a SVG-synoptic give the user a way to interact with the control system and display relevant information. The standardized graphical interfaces give a familiar look and feel across the entire facility. All motorized axes are controlled with the IcePAP motion controller. For the axes of the PGM, the IcePAP driver operates in hardware closed loop. Special care is taken in order to avoid slow and inaccurate movements of the PGM energy due to the non-linear relationship between the motors and the angular encoders.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF065 [0.870 MB]  
 
MOPGF099 Upgraded Control System for LHC Beam-Based Collimator Alignment alignment, software, controls, software-architecture 1
 
  • G. Valentino, G. Baud, M. Gąsior, S. Jackson, L.K. Jensen, J. Olexa, S. Redaelli, J. Wenninger
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), over 100 movable collimators are connected to a three-tier control system which moves them to the required settings throughout the operational cycle from injection to collision energy. A dedicated control system was developed to align the collimators to the beam during machine commissioning periods and hence determine operational settings for the active run. During Long Shutdown 1, the control system was upgraded to allow beam-based alignments to be performed using embedded beam position monitors in 18 newly installed collimators as well as beam loss monitors. This paper presents the new collimation controls architecture for LHC Run II along with several modifications in the Java-based application layer.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF099 [1.414 MB]  
 
MOPGF136 ADaMS 3: An Enhanced Access Control System for CERN controls, interface, target, operation 1
 
  • P. Martel, Ch. Delamare, G. Godineau, R. Nunes
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  ADaMS is CERN's Access Distribution and Management System. It evaluates access authorizations to more than 400 zones and for more than 35k persons. Although accesses are granted based on a combination of training courses followed, administrative authorizations and the radio-protection situation of an individual, the policies and technicalities are constantly evolving along with the laboratory's activities; the current version of ADaMS is based on a 7 year old design, and is starting to show its limits. A new version of ADaMS (3) will allow improved coordination with CERN's scheduling and planning tools (used heavily during technical shutdowns, for instance), will allow CERN's training catalog to change without impacting access management and will simplify and reduce the administrative workload of granting access. The new version will provide enhanced self-services to end users by focusing on access points (the physical barriers) instead of safety zones. ADaMS 3 will be able to cope better with changing and new requirements, as well as the multiplication of access points. The project requires the cooperation of a dozen services at CERN, and should take 18 months to develop.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF136 [1.258 MB]  
 
MOPGF140 Integration of PLC's in Tango Control Systems Using PyPLC TANGO, controls, PLC, database 1
 
  • S. Rubio-Manrique, M. Broseta, G. Cuní, D. Fernandez-Carreiras, A. Rubio, J. Villanueva
    ALBA-CELLS Synchrotron, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain
 
  The Equipment Protection Systems and Personnel Safety Systems of the ALBA Synchrotron are complex and highly distributed control systems based on PLC's from different vendors. EPS and PSS not only regulate the interlocks of the whole ALBA facility but provide an extense network of analog and digital sensors that collect information from all subsystems; as well as its logical states. TANGO is the Control System framework used at ALBA, providing several tools and services (GUI's, Archiving, Alarms) in which EPS and PSS systems must be integrated. PyPLC, a dynamic Tango device, have been developed in python to provide a flexible interface and enable PLC developers to automatically update it. This paper describes how protection systems and the PLC code generation cycle have been fully integrated within TANGO Control System at ALBA.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF140 [2.242 MB]  
 
MOPGF179 Status of the Solaris Control System - Collaborations and Technology controls, TANGO, software, operation 1
 
  • P.P. Goryl, C.J. Bocchetta, P. Bulira, A.I. Wawrzyniak, K. Wawrzyniak, L. Żytniak
    Solaris, Kraków, Poland
  • V.H. Hardion, J.J. Jamroz, J. Lidón-Simon, M. Lindberg, A.G. Persson, D.P. Spruce
    MAX-lab, Lund, Sweden
  • M.J. Stankiewicz
    Solaris National Synchrotron Radiation Centre, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland
  • T. Szymocha
    Cyfronet, Kraków, Poland
 
  Funding: Work supported by the European Regional Development Fund within the frame of the Innovative Economy Operational Program: POIG.02.01.00-12-213/09.
The Solaris is a synchrotron light source starting just now in Kraków, Poland. It is built with strong collaboration with other European accelerator facilities. The MAX-IV project in Lund, Sweden and Tango Community are the most important partners in the project. Solaris has built a twin copy of MAX-IV 1.5GeV ring and linear accelerator based on the same components as the ones of MAX-IV. Thus, both facilities share know-how and apply similar technologies for the control system, among them the Tango CS is used for software layer. Status of the control system in Kraków as well as collaborations and technological choices impact on its success will be presented.
 
poster icon Poster MOPGF179 [2.496 MB]  
 
TUB3O04 The LMJ System Sequences Adaptability (French MegaJoule Laser) laser, controls, target, database 1
 
  • Y. Tranquille-Marques, J. Fleury, J. Nicoloso
    CEA, LE BARP cedex, France
 
  The French Atomic and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA : Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives) is currently building the Laser MegaJoule facility. In 2014, the first 8 beams and the target area were commissioned and the first physics campaign (a set of several shots) was achieved. On the LMJ, each shot requires more or less the same operations except for the settings that change from shot to shot. The supervisory controls provide five semi-automated sequence programs to repeat and schedule actions on devices. Three of them are now regularly used to drive the LMJ. Sequence programs need to have different qualities such as flexibility, contextual adaptability, reliability and repeatability. Currently, the calibration shots sequence drives 328 actions towards local control systems. However, this sequence is already dimensioned to drive 22 bundles, which will lead to manage almost 5300 actions. This paper introduces the organization of the control system used by sequence programs, the sequence adjustments files, the grafcets of sequences, the GUIs, the software and different tools used to control the facility.  
slides icon Slides TUB3O04 [11.268 MB]  
 
TUC3O04 Reusable Patient Safety System Framework for the Proton Therapy Centre at PSI EPICS, proton, interface, FPGA 1
 
  • P. Fernandez Carmona, M. Eichin, M. Grossmann, A. Mayor, H.A. Regele
    PSI, Villigen, Switzerland
  • E. Johansen
    PSI, Villigen, Villigen, Switzerland
 
  A new gantry for cancer treatment is being installed at the Proton Therapy Centre in the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), where already two gantries and a fixed line operate. A protection system is required to ensure the safety of patients, requiring stricter redundancy, verification and quality assurance (QA) measures than other accelerators. It supervises the Therapy System, sensors, monitors and operator interface and can actuate magnets and beam blockers. We built a reusable framework to increase the maintainability of the system using the commercial IFC1210 VME controller, developed for other PSI facilities. It features a FPGA implementing all the safety logic and two processors, one dedicated to debugging and the other to integrating in the facility's EPICS environment. The framework permitted us to reduce the design and test time by an estimated 40% thanks to a modular approach. It will also allow a future renovation of other areas with minimum effort. Additionally it provides built-in diagnostics such as time measurement statistics, interlock analysis and internal visibility. The automation of several tasks reduces the burden of QA in an environment with tight time constraints.  
slides icon Slides TUC3O04 [10.385 MB]  
 
WEB3O04 Accelerator Modelling and Message Logging with ZeroMQ controls, CORBA, database, framework 1
 
  • J.T.M. Chrin, M. Aiba, A. Rawat, Z. Wang
    PSI, Villigen PSI, Switzerland
 
  ZeroMQ is an emerging message oriented middleware architecture that is being increasingly adopted in the software engineering of distributed control and data acquisition systems within the accelerator community. The rich array of built-in core messaging patterns may, however, be equally applied to within the domain of high-level applications, where the seamless integration of accelerator models and message logging capabilities, respectively serve to extend the effectiveness of beam dynamics applications and allow for their monitoring. Various advanced patterns that include intermediaries and proxies further provide for reliable service-oriented brokers, as may be required in real-world operations. A report on an investigation into ZeroMQ's suitability for integrating key distributed components into high-level applications, and the experience gained, are presented.  
slides icon Slides WEB3O04 [3.537 MB]  
 
WED3O04 HDB++: A New Archiving System for TANGO TANGO, database, device-server, interface 1
 
  • L. Pivetta, C. Scafuri, G. Scalamera, G. Strangolino, L. Zambon
    Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Italy
  • R. Bourtembourg, J.L. Pons, P.V. Verdier
    ESRF, Grenoble, France
 
  The TANGO release 8 led to several enhancements, including the adoption of the ZeroMQ library for faster and lightweight event-driven communication. Exploiting these improved capabilities, a high performance, event-driven archiving system written in C++ has been developed. It inherits the database structure from the existing TANGO Historical Data Base (HDB) and introduces new storage architecture possibilities, better internal diagnostic capabilities and an optimized API. Its design allows storing data into traditional database management systems such as MySQL or into NoSQL database such as Apache Cassandra. This paper describes the software design of the new HDB++ archiving system, the current state of the implementation and gives some performance figures and use cases.  
slides icon Slides WED3O04 [1.397 MB]  
 
WEM310 How Cassandra Improves Performances and Availability of HDB++ Tango Archiving System TANGO, database, device-server, controls 1
 
  • R. Bourtembourg, J.L. Pons, P.V. Verdier
    ESRF, Grenoble, France
 
  The TANGO release 8 led to several enhancements, including the adoption of the ZeroMQ library for faster and lightweight event-driven communication. Exploiting these improved capabilities, a high performance, event-driven archiving system, named Tango HDB++*, has been developed. Its design gives the possibility to store archiving data into Apache Cassandra: a high performance scalable NoSQL distributed database, providing High Availability service and replication, with no single point of failure. HDB++ with Cassandra will open up new perspectives for TANGO in the era of big data and will be the starting point of new big data analytics/data mining applications, breaking the limits of the archiving systems which are based on traditional relational databases. This paper describes the current state of the implementation and our experience with Apache Cassandra in the scope of the Tango HDB++ project. It also gives some performance figures and use cases where using Cassandra with Tango HDB++ is a good fit.
* HDB++ project is the result of a collaboration between the Elettra synchrotron (Trieste) and the European Radiation Synchrotron Facility (Grenoble)
 
slides icon Slides WEM310 [1.010 MB]  
poster icon Poster WEM310 [2.415 MB]  
 
WEPGF014 A Data Acquisition System for Abnormal RF Waveform at SACLA LLRF, controls, cavity, data-acquisition 1
 
  • M. Ishii, M. Kago
    JASRI/SPring-8, Hyogo-ken, Japan
  • T. Fukui
    RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Innovative Light Sources Division, Hyogo, Japan
  • T. Hasegawa, M. Yoshioka
    SES, Hyogo-pref., Japan
  • T. Inagaki, H. Maesaka, T. Ohshima, Y. Otake
    RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo, Japan
  • T. Maruyama
    RIKEN/SPring-8, Hyogo, Japan
 
  At the X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) facility, SACLA, an event-synchronized data acquisition system has been utilized for the XFEL operation. This system collects every shot-by-shot data, such as point data of the phase and amplitude of the RF cavity pickup signals, in synchronization with the beam operation cycle. This system also acquires RF waveform data every 10 minutes. In addition to the periodic waveform acquisition, an abnormal RF waveform that suddenly occurs should be collected for failure diagnostics. Therefore, we developed an abnormal RF waveform data acquisition (DAQ) system, which consists of the VME systems, a cache server, and a NoSQL database system, Apache Cassandra. When the VME system detects an abnormal RF waveform, it collects all related waveforms of the same shot. The waveforms are stored in Cassandra through the cache server. Before the installation to SACLA, we ensured the performance with a prototype system. In 2014, we installed the DAQ system into the injection part with five VME systems. In 2015, we will acquire waveforms from the low-level RF control system configured by 74 VME systems at the SACLA accelerator.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF014 [0.974 MB]  
 
WEPGF043 Metadatastore: A Primary Data Store for NSLS-2 Beamlines experiment, data-analysis, database, interface 1
 
  • A. Arkilic, D.B. Allan, T.A. Caswell, L.R. Dalesio, W.K. Lewis
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Department of Energy, Brookhaven National Lab
The beamlines at NSLS-II are among the highest instrumented, and controlled of any worldwide. Each beamline can produce unstructured data sets in various formats. This data should be made available for data analysis and processing for beamline scientists and users. Various data flow systems are in place in numerous synchrotrons, however these are very domain specific and cannot handle such unstructured data. We have developed a data flow service, metadatastore, that manages experimental data in NSLS-II beamlines. This service enables data analysis and visualization clients to access this service either directly or via databroker api in a consistent and partition tolerant fashion, providing a reliable and easy to use interface to our state-of-the-art beamlines.
 
 
WEPGF050 Integrated Detector Control and Calibration Processing at the European XFEL detector, controls, framework, photon 1
 
  • A. Münnich, S. Hauf, B.C. Heisen, F. Januschek, M. Kuster, P.M. Lang, N. Raab, T. Rüter, J. Sztuk, M. Turcato
    XFEL. EU, Hamburg, Germany
 
  The European X-ray Free Electron Laser is a high-intensity X-ray light source currently being constructed in the area of Hamburg, that will provide spatially coherent X-rays in the energy range between 0.25 keV and 25 keV. The machine will deliver 10 trains/s, consisting of up to 2700 pulses, with a 4.5 MHz repetition rate. The LPD, DSSC and AGIPD detectors are being developed to provide high dynamic-range Mpixel imaging capabilities at the mentioned repetition rates. A consequence of these detector characteristics is that they generate raw data volumes of up to 15 Gbyte/s. In addition the detector's on-sensor memory-cell and multi-/non-linear gain architectures pose unique challenges in data correction and calibration, requiring online access to operating conditions and control settings. We present how these challenges are addressed within XFEL's control and analysis framework Karabo, which integrates access to hardware conditions, acquisition settings (also using macros) and distributed computing. Implementation of control and calibration software is mainly in Python, using self-optimizing (py) CUDA code, numpy and iPython parallels to achieve near-real time performance for calibration application.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF050 [3.425 MB]  
 
WEPGF071 Python Scripting for Instrument Control and Online Data Treatment controls, interface, experiment, software 1
 
  • N. Xiong, N. Hauser, D. Mannicke
    ANSTO, Menai, New South Wales, Australia
 
  Scripting is an important feature of instrument control software. It allows scientists to execute a sequence of tasks to run complex experiments, and it makes a software developers' life easier when testing and deploying new features. Modern instrument control applications require easy to develop and reliable scripting support. At ANSTO we provide a Python scripting interface for Gumtree. Gumtree is an application that provides three features; instrument control, data treatment and visualisation for neutron scattering instruments. The scripting layer has been used to coordinate these three features. The language is simple and well documented, so scientists require minimal programming experience. The scripting engine has a web interface so that users can use a web browser to run scripts remotely. The script interface has a numpy-like library that makes data treatment easier. It also has a GUI library that automatically generates control panels for scripts. The same script can be loaded in both the workbench (desktop) application and the web service application for online data treatment. In both cases a GUI will be generated with similar look and feel.
* Gumtree T. Lam, N. Hauser, A. Gotz, P. Hathaway, F. Franceschini, H. Rayner, GumTree. An integrated scientific experiment environment, Physica B 385-386, 1330-1332 (2006)
 
poster icon Poster WEPGF071 [2.727 MB]  
 
WEPGF093 CXv4, a Modular Control System controls, network, software, hardware 1
 
  • D. Bolkhovityanov, P.B. Cheblakov, F.A. Emanov
    BINP SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia
 
  CX control system is used at VEPP-5 and several other BINP facilities. CX version 4 is designed to provide more flexibility and enable interoperability with other control systems. In addition to device drivers, most of its components are implemented in a modular fashion, including data access at both client and server sides. The server itself is a library. This approach allows clients to access several different control systems simultaneously and natively (without any gateways). CXv4 servers are able to provide data access to clients from diverse CS architectures/protocols, subject to appropriate network module being loaded. The server library, coupled with "null link" client-server access module, allows to create standalone monolythic programs for specific small applications (such as test benches and device test screens/utilities) using the same ready code from large-scale control system but without its complexity. CXv4 design principles and solutions are discussed and first deployment results are presented.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF093 [0.667 MB]  
 
WEPGF100 DRAMA 2 - An Evolutionary Leap for the DRAMA Environment for Instrumentation Software Development status, interface, software, controls 1
 
  • T.J. Farrell, K. Shortridge
    AAO, North Ryde, Australia
 
  The DRAMA Environment provides an API for distributed instrument software development. It originated at the Anglo-Australian Observatory (now Australian Astronomical Observatory) in the early 1990s, in response to the need for a software environment for large distributed and heterogeneous systems, with some components requiring real-time performance. It was first used for the AAO's 2dF fibre positioner project for the Anglo-Australian Telescope. 2dF is still in use today, but has changed dramatically over time. DRAMA is used for other AAO systems and is or has been used at various other observatories looking for a similar solution. Whilst DRAMA has evolved and many features were added, there had been no big changes. It was still a largely C language based system, with some C++ wrappers. It did not provide good support for threading or exceptions. Ideas for proper thread support within DRAMA have been in development for some years, but C++11 has provided many features which allow a high quality implementation. The opportunity provided by C++11 has been taken to make significant changes to the DRAMA API, producing a modern and more reliable interface to DRAMA, known as DRAMA2.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF100 [5.724 MB]  
 
WEPGF107 Multi-Host Message Routing in MADOCA II controls, network, operation, free-electron-laser 1
 
  • T. Matsumoto, Y. Furukawa, K. Okada
    JASRI/SPring-8, Hyogo-ken, Japan
 
  MADOCA II is a next generation of Message And Database Oriented Control Architecture (MADOCA) and implemented into control system of SPring-8 and SACLA data acquisition (DAQ) system since 2013. In 2014, SACLA introduced a third beam line to increase the capacity of experiments. Then sophisticated control architecture needed to be developed to prevent miss operations among beamlines. In this paper, multi-host message routing in MADOCA II and its application to SALCA DAQ system to solve the problem is presented. In SACLA DAQ system, a master server was added which intermediates control messages between clients and equipment management servers. Since the access control can be centralized to the master server, reliable operation can be had by avoiding the influence by accidental modification of DAQ setting by end-users. The multi-host message routing was implemented to add an extension in MADOCA II by forwarding specific message objects to other hosts. Some technical issues related to messaging loop and time delay, are also addressed. It is also planned to utilize this technique to other cases in BL at SPring-8 where access control under firewall is required.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF107 [0.816 MB]  
 
WEPGF118 Use of Tornado in KAT-­7 and MeerKAT Framework software, controls, framework, operation 1
 
  • C.C.A. de Villiers, B. Xaia
    SKA South Africa, National Research Foundation of South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa
 
  Funding: SKA South Africa, National Research Foundation of South Africa, Department of Science and Technology, 3rd Floor, The Park, Park Road, Pinelands, Cape Town, South Africa, 7405.
The KAT­-7 and MeerKAT radio telescope control systems (www.ska.ac.za) are built on a rich Python architecture. At its core, we use KATCP (Karoo Array Telescope Communications Protocol), a text­-based protocol that has served the projects very well. KATCP is supported by every device and connected software component in the system. However, its original implementation relied on threads to support asynchronous operations, and this has sometimes complicated the evolution of the software. Since MeerKAT (with 64 dishes) will be much larger and more complex than KAT-7, the Control and Monitoring (CAM) team investigated some alternatives to classical threading. We have adopted Tornado (www.tornadoweb.org) as the asynchronous engine for KATCP. Tornado, popular for Web applications, is built on a robust and very efficient coroutine paradigm that in turn is based on Python's generators. Co-routines avoid the complexity of thread re-entrancy and lifetime management, resulting in cleaner and more maintainable user code. This paper will describe our migration to a Tornado co-routine architecture, highlighting the benefits and some of the pitfalls and implementation challenges we have met.
*www.tornadoweb.org.
 
poster icon Poster WEPGF118 [6.029 MB]  
 
WEPGF121 Operation Status of J-PARC Timing System and Future Plan timing, operation, controls, network 1
 
  • N. Kamikubota, N. Yamamoto
    J-PARC, KEK & JAEA, Ibaraki-ken, Japan
  • N. Kikuzawa, F. Tamura
    JAEA/J-PARC, Tokai-mura, Japan
 
  The beam commissioning of J-PARC started in November, 2006. Since then, the timing system of J-PARC accelerator complex has contributed stable beam operations of three accelerators: a 400-MeV linac (LI), a 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS), and a 50-GeV synchrotron (MR). The timing system handles two different repetition cycles: 25 Hz for LI and RCS, and 2.48-6.00 sec. for MR (MR cycle). In addition, the timing system is capable to provide beams to two different experimental facilities in single MR cycle: Material and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) and Neutrino Experimental Facility (NU), or, MLF and Hadron Experimental Facility (HD). Recently, a plan to introduce a new facility, Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Experimental Facility (ADS), around 2018, has been discussed. Studies for the timing system upgrade are started: change of the master repetition rate from 25Hz to 50 Hz, and a scheme to provide beams to three different experimental facilities in single MR cycle (MLF, NU and ADS or MLF, HD and ADS). This paper reviews the 8-year operation experience of the J-PARC timing system, followed by a present perspective of upgrade studies.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF121 [1.042 MB]  
 
WEPGF133 TINE Studio, Making Life Easy for Administrators, Operators and Developers. controls, operation, interface, database 1
 
  • P. Duval, M. Lomperski
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
  • J. Bobnar
    Cosylab, Ljubljana, Slovenia
 
  A mature control system will provide central services such as alarm handling, archiving, location and naming, debugging, etc. along with development tools and administrative utilities. It has become common to refer to the collection of these services as a 'studio'. Indeed Control System Studio (CSS)* strives to provide such services independent of the control system protocol. Such a 'one-size-fits-all' approach is likely, however, to focus on features and behavior of the most prominent control system protocol in use, providing a good fit there but perhaps offering only a rudimentary fit for 'other' control systems. TINE** is for instance supported by CSS but is much better served by making use of TINE Studio. This paper reports here on the rich set of services and utilities comprising TINE Studio.
* http://www.controlsystemstudio.org
** http://tine.desy.de
 
poster icon Poster WEPGF133 [2.523 MB]  
 
WEPGF135 Using the Vaadin Web Framework for Developing Rich Accelerator Controls User Interfaces controls, framework, interface, real-time 1
 
  • K.A. Brown, T. D'Ottavio, W. Fu, S. Nemesure
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy
Applications used for Collider-Accelerator Controls at Brookhaven National Laboratory typically run as console level programs on a Linux operating system. One essential requirement for accelerator controls applications is bidirectional synchronized IO data communication. Several new web frameworks (Vaadin, GXT, node.js, etc.) have made it possible to develop web based Accelerator Controls applications that provide all the features of console based UI applications that includes bidirectional IO. Web based applications give users flexibility by providing an architecture independent domain for running applications. Security is established by restricting access to users within the local network while not limiting this access strictly to Linux consoles. Additionally, the web framework provides the opportunity to develop mobile device applications that makes it convenient for users to access information while away from the office. This paper explores the feasibility of using the Vaadin web framework for developing UI applications for Collider-Accelerator controls at Brookhaven National Laboratory.
 
poster icon Poster WEPGF135 [0.986 MB]  
 
WEPGF137 Adopting and Adapting Control System Studio at Diamond Light Source controls, interface, Windows, framework 1
 
  • M.J. Furseman, N.W. Battam, T.M. Cobb, I.J. Gillingham, M.T. Heron, G. Knap, W.A.H. Rogers
    DLS, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
 
  Since commissioning, Diamond Light Source has used the Extensible Display Manager (EDM) to provide a GUI to its EPICS-based control system. As Linux moves away from X-Windows the future of EDM is uncertain, leading to the evaluation of Control System Studio (CS-Studio) as a replacement. Diamond has a user base accustomed to the interface provided by EDM and an infrastructure designed to launch the multiple windows associated with it. CS-Studio has been adapted to provide an interface that is similar to EDM's while keeping the new features of CS-Studio available. This will allow as simple as possible a transition to be made to using CS-Studio as Diamond's user interface to EPICS. It further opens up the possibility of integrating the control system user interface with those in the Eclipse based GDA and DAWN tools which are used for data acquisition and data analysis at Diamond.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF137 [1.822 MB]  
 
WEPGF142 Advanced Matlab GUI Development with the DataGUI Library software, interface, controls, status 1
 
  • S.M. Meykopff
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
 
  On the DESY campus Matlab is a widely used tool for creating complex user interfaces. Although the on-board GUI tools are easy to use and provide quick results, the generated low-level code lacks uniformity and advanced features like automatic verification and conversion of input and output data. These limitations are overcome by the newly developed DataGUI library. The library is based on the model-view-controller software pattern and supports enhanced data handling, undocumented Matlab GUI elements, and configurable resizing of the user interface. An outlook on features of the upcoming release is also presented.  
 
WEPGF146 GUI Style Guide for Control System Applications at ESS controls, background, software, interface 1
 
  • F. Amand, M. Pavleski, M. Pleško
    Cosylab, Ljubljana, Slovenia
  • L. Fernandez
    ESS, Lund, Sweden
 
  To help developers create consistent-looking control system application GUIs, the European Spallation Source Integrated Control Systems group asked Cosylab to develop a Style Guide document. Its purpose is to avoid that GUIs needlessly diverge and make the end-result of all screens combined look harmonious, even if GUIs have been developed over several years by many contributors. Also it will speed up development, by letting developers start from design patterns, rather than starting "from a blank page". The document defines a set of basic panel sizes, containing a 960px-style grid for consistent organization of content. It also defines color scheme and font usage, in-line with the overall ESS corporate communications manual, with the addition of signal colors. In addition it shows example screens to serve as GUI design patterns for typical screen types such as engineering screens, control applications and synoptic screens. It concludes by setting rules and recommendations for the usage of automation symbols and display of engineering and physical units. The document is further complemented by a separate document with Usability Guidelines for Human-Machine interfaces.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF146 [1.863 MB]  
 
WEPGF148 Unifying All TANGO Control Services in a Customizable Graphical User Interface controls, TANGO, interface, framework 1
 
  • S. Rubio-Manrique, G. Cuní, D. Fernandez-Carreiras, C. Pascual-Izarra, D. Roldan
    ALBA-CELLS Synchrotron, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain
  • E. Al-Dmour
    MAX-lab, Lund, Sweden
 
  TANGO is a distributed Control System with an active community of developers. The community features multiple services like Archiving or Alarms with an heterogeneous mix of technologies and look-and-feels that must be integrated in the final user workflow. The Viewer and Commander Control Application (VACCA) was developed on top of Taurus to provide TANGO with the user experience of a commercial SCADA, keeping the advantages of open source. The Taurus GUI application enables scientists to design their own live applications using drag-and-drop from the widget catalog. The VACCA User Interface provides a template mechanism for synoptic-driven applications and extends the widget catalog to interact with all the components of the control system (Alarms, Archiving, Databases, Hosts Administration). The elements of VACCA are described in this paper, as well as its mechanisms to encapsulate all services in a GUI for an specific subsystem (e.g. Vacuum).  
poster icon Poster WEPGF148 [1.590 MB]  
 
WEPGF153 Karabo-GUI: A Multi-Purpose Graphical Front-End for the Karabo Framework controls, distributed, data-acquisition, interface 1
 
  • M. Teichmann, B.C. Heisen, K. Weger, J. Wiggins
    XFEL. EU, Hamburg, Germany
 
  The Karabo GUI is a generic graphical user interface (GUI) which is currently developed at the European XFEL GmbH. It allows the complete management of the Karabo distributed control and data acquisition system. Remote applications (devices) can be instantiated, operated and terminated. Devices are listed in a live navigation view and from the self-description inherent to every device a default configuration panel is generated. The user may combine interrelated components into one project. Such a project includes persisted device configurations, custom control panels and macros. Expert panels can be built by intermixing static graphical elements with dynamic widgets connected to parameters of the distributed system. The same panel can also be used to graphically configure and execute data analysis workflows. Other features include an embedded IPython scripting console, logging, notification and alarm handling. The GUI is user-centric and will restrict display or editing capability according to the user's role and the current device state. The GUI is based on PyQt technology and acts as a thin network client to a central Karabo GUI-Server.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF153 [0.764 MB]  
 
THHC3O01 The MeerKAT Graphical User Interface Technology Stack interface, controls, monitoring, framework 1
 
  • M. Alberts, F. Joubert
    SKA South Africa, National Research Foundation of South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa
 
  Funding: SKA South Africa National Research Foundation of South Africa Department of Science and Technology 3rd floor, The Park Park Road Pinelands ZA - Cape Town 7405 +27 21 506 7300
The South African MeerKAT radio telescope, currently being built some 90 km outside the small Northern Cape town of Carnarvon, is a precursor to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope and will be integrated into the mid-frequency component of SKA Phase 1. Providing the graphical user interface (GUI) for MeerKAT required a reassessment of currently employed technologies with a strong focus on leveraging modern user interface technologies and design techniques. An extensive investigation was performed to evaluate and assess potential GUI technologies and frameworks. The result of this investigative study identified a responsive web application for the frontend and asynchronous web server for the backend. In particular the AngularJS framework used in combination with Material Design principles, Websockets and other popular javascript layout and imaging libraries, such as D3.js, proved an ideal fit for the requirements of the MeerKAT GUI frontend. This paper will provide a summary of the user interface technology investigation and further expound on the whole technology stack adopted to provide a modern user interface with real time capabilities.
 
slides icon Slides THHC3O01 [10.201 MB]  
 
THHC3O03 Effortless Creation of Control & Data Acquisition Graphical User Interfaces with Taurus TANGO, controls, EPICS, interface 1
 
  • C. Pascual-Izarra, G. Cuní, C.M. Falcón Torres, D. Fernandez-Carreiras, Z. Reszela, M. Rosanes Siscart
    ALBA-CELLS Synchrotron, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain
  • T.M. Coutinho
    ESRF, Grenoble, France
 
  Creating and supporting Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) for experiment control and data acquisition has traditionally been a major drain of time and resources for laboratories. GUIs often need to be adapted to new equipment or methods, but typical users lack the technical skills to perform the required modifications, let alone to create new GUIs. Here we present the Taurus* framework which allows a non-programmer to create a fully-featured GUI (with forms, plots, synoptics, etc) from scratch in a few minutes using a "wizard" as well as to customize and expand it by drag-and-dropping elements around at execution time. Moreover, Taurus also gives full control to more advanced users to access, create and customize a GUI programmatically using Python. Taurus is a free, open source, multi-platform pure Python module (it uses PyQt for the GUI). Its support and development are driven by an active and welcoming community participated by several major laboratories and companies which use it for their developments. While Taurus was originally designed within the Sardana** suite for the Tango*** control system, now it can also support other control systems (even simultaneously) via plug-ins.
* Taurus Home Page: http://taurus-scada.org** Sardana Home Page: http://sardana-controls.org*** Tango Home Page: http://tango-controls.org
 
slides icon Slides THHC3O03 [23.180 MB]  
 
THHD3O06 Overview of the Monitoring Data Archive used on MeerKAT database, interface, monitoring, status 1
 
  • M.J. Slabber
    SKA South Africa, National Research Foundation of South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa
 
  Funding: SKA South Africa National Research Foundation of South Africa Department of Science and Technology.
MeerKAT, the 64-receptor radio telescope being built in the Karoo, South Africa, by Square Kilometre Array South Africa (SKA SA), comprises a large number of components. All components are interfaced to the Control and Monitoring (CAM) system via the Karoo Array Telescope Communication Protocol (KATCP). KATCP is used extensively for internal communications between CAM components and other subsystems. A KATCP interface exposes requests and sensors. Sampling strategies are set on sensors, ranging from several updates per second to infrequent updates. The sensor samples are of multiple types, from small integers to text fields. As the various components react to user input and sensor samples, the samples with timestamps need to be permanently stored and made available for scientists, engineers and operators to query and analyse. This paper present how the storage infrastructure (dubbed Katstore) manages the volume, velocity and variety of this data. Katstore is comprised of several stages of data collection and transportation. The stages move the data from monitoring nodes to storage node to permanent storage to offsite storage. Additional information (e.g. type, description, units) about each sensor is stored with the samples.
 
slides icon Slides THHD3O06 [29.046 MB]