Keyword: hardware
Paper Title Other Keywords Page
MOB3O03 MAX IV Laboratory, Milestones and Lessons Learned controls, TANGO, software, GUI 1
 
  • V.H. Hardion, Y. Cerenius, F. H. Hennies, K. Larsson, J. Lidón-Simon, M. Sjöström, D.P. Spruce
    MAX-lab, Lund, Sweden
 
  The MAX IV Laboratory is a new scientific research facility based on synchrotron light being built at Lund University, southern Sweden. The accelerator consists of one full energy linear accelerator providing two storage rings at 1.5 GeV & 3 GeV and a Short Pulse Facility. Additionally more than 13 beamlines are planned to be built among which should be operational for the first users in 2016. The current status and approach of the control system is presented from its technical and organisational point of view, including the stakeholders, as well as the lessons learned from the commissioning as part of our continuous improvement for the future.  
slides icon Slides MOB3O03 [19.077 MB]  
 
MOD3I01 Bayesian Reliability Model for Beam Permit System of RHIC at BNL framework, collider, operation, factory 1
 
  • P. Chitnis
    Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, USA
  • K.A. Brown
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy.
Bayesian Analysis provides a statistical framework for updating prior knowledge as observational evidence is acquired. It can handle complex and realistic models with flexibility. The Beam Permit System (BPS) of RHIC plays a key role in safeguarding against the faults occurring in the collider, hence directly impacts RHIC availability. Earlier a multistate reliability model* was developed to study the failure characteristics of the BPS that incorporated manufacturer and military handbook data. Over the course of its 15 years of operation, RHIC has brought forth operational failure data. This work aims towards the integration of earlier reliability calculations with operational failure data using Bayesian analysis. This paper discusses the Bayesian inference of the BPS reliability using a two-parameter Weibull survival model, with unknown scale and shape parameters. As the joint posterior distribution for Weibull with both parameters unknown is analytically intractable, the Markov Chain Monte Carlo methodology with Metropolis-Hastings algorithm is used to obtain the inference. Selection criteria for the Weibull distribution, prior density and hyperparameters are also discussed.
*P. Chitnis et al., 'A Monte Carlo Simulation Approach to the Reliability Modeling of the Beam Permit System of Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL', Proc. of ICALEPCS'13, San Francisco, CA.
 
slides icon Slides MOD3I01 [3.929 MB]  
 
MOM311 ALMA Release Management: A Practical Approach software, controls, site, operation 1
 
  • R. Soto, N. Saez, T.C. Shen
    ALMA Observatory, Santiago, Chile
  • J.P.A. Ibsen
    ESO, Santiago, Chile
 
  The ALMA software is a large collection of modules, which implements the functionality needed for the observatory day-to-day operations. The main ALMA software components include: array/antenna control/correlator, submission/processing of science proposals, telescope calibration and data archiving. The implementation of new features and improvements for every software subsystem must be coordinated by considering developers schedule, observatory milestones and testing resources available to verify new software. This paper describes the software delivery process adopted by ALMA since the construction phase and its evolution until these days. It also presents the acceptance procedure implemented by the observatory for validating the software used for science operations. Main roles of the software delivery and acceptance processes are mentioned on this paper by including their responsibility at the different development and testing phases. Finally, some ideas are presented about how the model should change in the near future by considering the operational reality of ALMA Observatory.  
slides icon Slides MOM311 [3.471 MB]  
poster icon Poster MOM311 [16.924 MB]  
 
MOPGF016 Improving the Compact Muon Solenoid Electromagnetic Calorimeter Control and Safety Systems for the Large Hadron Collider Run 2 detector, controls, software, experiment 1
 
  • D.R.S. Di Calafiori, G. Dissertori, L. Djambazov, O. Holme, W. Lustermann
    ETH, Zurich, Switzerland
  • P. Adzic, P. Cirkovic, D. Jovanovic
    VINCA, Belgrade, Serbia
  • S. Zelepoukine
    UW-Madison/PD, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
 
  Funding: Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF); Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of Serbia
The first long shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider (LS1, 2013-2015) provided an opportunity for significant upgrades of the detector control and safety systems of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter. A thorough evaluation was undertaken, building upon experience acquired during several years of detector operations. Substantial improvements were made to the monitoring systems in order to extend readout ranges and provide improved monitoring precision and data reliability. Additional remotely controlled hardware devices and automatic software routines were implemented to optimize the detector recovery time in the case of failures. The safety system was prepared in order to guarantee full support for both commercial off-the-shelf and custom hardware components throughout the next accelerator running period. The software applications were modified to operate on redundant host servers, to fulfil new requirements of the experiment. User interface extensions were also added to provide a more complete overview of the control system. This paper summarises the motivation, implementation and validation of the major improvements made to the hardware and software components during the LS1 and the early data-taking period of LHC Run 2.
 
poster icon Poster MOPGF016 [2.392 MB]  
 
MOPGF020 Detector and Run Control Systems for the NA62 Fixed-Target Experiment at CERN controls, operation, experiment, detector 1
 
  • P. Golonka, R. Fantechi, M. Gonzalez-Berges, F. Varela
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • V. Falaleev
    JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region, Russia
  • N. Lurkin
    Birmingham University, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • R.F. Page
    University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom
 
  The Detector and Run Control systems for the NA62 experiment, which started physics data-taking in Autumn of 2014, were designed, developed and deployed in collaboration between the Physics and Engineering Departments at CERN. Based on the commonly used control frameworks, UNICOS and JCOP, they were developed with scarce manpower while meeting the challenge of extreme agility, evolving requirements, as well as integration of new types of hardware. This paper presents, for the first time, the architecture of these systems and discusses the challenges and experience in developing and maintaining them during the first months of operation.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF020 [4.620 MB]  
 
MOPGF022 SIS18 Upgrade: The FAIR Compliant Renovation of the Data Acquisition System for Particle Detectors controls, detector, operation, synchrotron 1
 
  • R. Haseitl, H. Bräuning, T. Hoffmann, K. Lang, T. Milosic
    GSI, Darmstadt, Germany
 
  In preparation of FAIR, several well-established beam instrumentation systems of the GSI heavy-ion synchrotron SIS18 and its connected high-energy beam transfer lines (HEBT) have to be modernized. In this contribution, the data acquisition upgrade of particle detectors such as ion chambers and plastic scintillators is described. This covers the replacement of an outdated custom-built readout- and control hardware by modern FMC (FPGA mezzanine card) based I/O hardware, new multi-channel high voltage power supplies and a new data acquisition system (DAQ) for the VME based scalers. The latter will replace the old Kylix-based ABLASS software by LASSIE (Large Analog Signal and Scaling Information Environment) to fit into the new FAIR control system concept. LASSIE is based on FESA (Front End Software Architecture). FESA was originally developed by CERN and enhanced by GSI-specific modifications. Furthermore, the new particle detector DAQ will be able to take full advantage of the new FAIR timing system which is based on the White Rabbit protocol.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF022 [1.194 MB]  
 
MOPGF024 Testing Framework for the LHC Beam-based Feedback System framework, software, feedback, real-time 1
 
  • S. Jackson, D. Alves, L. Di Giulio, K. Fuchsberger, B. Kolad, E. Pedersen
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  During the first LHC shut-down period, software for the LHC Beam-based Feedback Controller (BFC) and Service Unit (BFSU) was migrated to new 64-bit multi-core hardware and to a new version of CERN's FESA3 real-time framework. This coincided with the transfer of responsibility to a new software team, charged with readying the systems for beam in 2015 as well as maintaining and improving the code-base in the future. In order to facilitate the comprehension of the system's 90'000+ existing lines of code, a new testing framework was developed which would not only serve to define the system's functional specification, but also provide acceptance tests for future releases. This paper presents how the BFC and BFSU systems were decoupled from each other as well as from the LHC plant's measurement and correction systems, thus allowing simulation-data driven instances to be deployed in a test environment. It also describes the resulting Java-based domain-specific language (DSL) which, when employed in JUnit, allows the formation of repeatable acceptance tests.  
 
MOPGF029 Personnel Protection System Upgrade for the LCLS Electron Beam Linac linac, operation, PLC, EPICS 1
 
  • C. Cyterski, E.P. Chin
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
 
  As facilities age and evolve, constant effort is needed in upgrading control system infrastructure; this applies to all aspects of an accelerator facility. Portions of the Personnel Protection System of the Linac Coherent Light Source are still relying on a legacy, relay-based Safety System. An upgrade is underway to modernize these systems using Siemens S7-300 Safety PLCs and Pilz PNOZMulti programmable controllers. The upgrade will be rolled out over multiple years requiring the implementation to be fully compatible with adjacent legacy system while setting the foundation for the new generation system. The solution relies on a modularized safety system which can be deployed in a short time (1 month) while being flexible enough to adapt to the evolving needs over the next 20 years.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF029 [0.274 MB]  
 
MOPGF036 Control System Developments at the Electron Storage Ring DELTA controls, software, network, EPICS 1
 
  • D. Schirmer, A. Althaus, F.H. Bahnsen
    DELTA, Dortmund, Germany
 
  Increasing demands, mandatory replacement of obsolete controls equipment as well as the introduction of new soft- and hardware technologies with short innovation cycles are some of the reasons why control systems need to be revised continuously. Thus, also at the EPICS-based DELTA control system, several projects have been tackled in recent years: (1) Embedding the new CHG-based short-pulse facility for VUV and THz radiation required, for example, the integration of IP-cameras, Raspberry-Pi PCs and EtherCat/TwinCat wired I/O-devices. (2) The request for a staff-free control room led to the programming of new web applications using Python and the Django framework. This development resulted in a web-based interlock system that can be run, amongst others, on Android-based mobile devices. (3) The virtualization infrastructure for server consolidation has been extended and migrated from XEN to the kernel based KVM approach. (4) I/O-units which were connected via conventional fieldbus systems (CAN, GPIB, RS-232/485), are now gradually replaced by TCP/IP-controlled devices. This paper describes details of these upgrades and further new developments.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF036 [1.158 MB]  
 
MOPGF037 Upgrades to Control Room Knobs at Slac National Accelerator Laboratory controls, software, EPICS, interface 1
 
  • S. L. Hoobler, S.C. Alverson, C. Cyterski, R.C. Sass
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
 
  For years, accelerator operators at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) have favored hardware knobs in the control room for accelerator tuning. Hardware knobs provide a tactile, intuitive, and efficient means of adjusting devices. The evolution of separate control systems for different accelerator facilities at SLAC has resulted in multiple flavors of knob hardware and software. To improve efficiency, space usage, and ease of use, the knob systems have been upgraded and integrated.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF037 [0.740 MB]  
 
MOPGF038 Design and Commissioning Results of MicroTCA Stripline BPM System linac, data-acquisition, software, electronics 1
 
  • S. L. Hoobler, R.S. Larsen, H. Loos, J.J. Olsen, S.R. Smith, T. Straumann, C. Xu, A. Young
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
 
  The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a free electron laser (FEL) facility operating at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). A stripline beam position monitor (BPM) system was developed at SLAC [1] to meet the performance requirements necessary to provide high-quality stable beams for LCLS. This design has been modified to achieve improved position resolution in a more compact form factor. Prototype installations of this system have been operating in the LCLS LINAC and tested at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). Production systems are deployed at the new PAL XFEL facility and at the SPEAR storage ring at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource at SLAC. This paper presents the design and commissioning results of this system.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF038 [0.809 MB]  
 
MOPGF040 Keck Telescope Control System Upgrade controls, software, operation, network 1
 
  • K.T. Tsubota, J.A. Mader
    W.M. Keck Observatory, Kamuela,, Hawaii, USA
 
  The Keck telescopes, located at one of the world's premier sites for astronomy, were the first of a new generation of very large ground-based optical/infrared telescopes with the first Keck telescope beginning science operations in May of 1993, and the second in October of 1996. The components of the telescopes and control systems are more than 15 years old. The upgrade to the control systems of the telescopes consists of mechanical, electrical, software and network components with the overall goals of improving performance, increasing reliability, addressing serious obsolescence issues and providing a knowledge refresh. This paper is a continuation of one published at the 2013 conference and will describe the current status of the control systems upgrade. It will detail the implementation and testing for the Keck II telescope, including successes and challenges met to date. Transitioning to nighttime operations will be discussed, as will implementation on the Keck I telescope.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF040 [3.444 MB]  
 
MOPGF042 EPICS IOC Based on Computer-On-Module for the LNL Laboratory controls, EPICS, software, beam-diagnostic 1
 
  • J.A. Vásquez, D. Pedretti, R. Ponchia
    INFN/LNL, Legnaro (PD), Italy
  • M.A. Bellato, R. Isocrate
    INFN- Sez. di Padova, Padova, Italy
  • M. Bertocco
    UNIPD, Padova (PD), Italy
 
  At LNL it is being carried out an upgrade campaign of the control systems of the accelerator complex. The two main goals are standardization of hardware and software and system interoperability. EPICS has been chosen as the standard framework for developing new control systems; this will address software standardization and system interoperability. In order to achieve hardware standardization, a new EPICS IOC is under development, which will become a basic construction block for all future control systems. The COM (Computer-on-Modules) from factor has been chosen as the hardware platform for the IOC, along with the peripheral devices needed for developing all the foreseen control system at LNL. Prototypes of this IOC has been developed using ADLINK's Type 6 COM Express modules on generic carrier boards with DIO, ADC and DAC expansion boards. These prototypes have been tested under typical applications at LNL in order to validate the hardware platform choice. Experimental results show that the performance of the IOC in terms of effective resolution (ENOB and bias error), sample rates and CPU usage is suitable for satisfying the requirements of the control systems.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF042 [1.904 MB]  
 
MOPGF047 Revolution Project: Progress in the Evolution of Soleil Motion Control Model* controls, software, embedded, TANGO 1
 
  • S.Z. Zhang, Y.-M. Abiven, F. Blache, D. Corruble, C.K. Kheffafa
    SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
  • S.M. Minolli
    NEXEYA SYSTEMS, LA COURONNE, France
 
  SOLEIL is a third generation synchrotron radiation source located near Paris in France. REVOLUTION (REconsider Various contrOLler for yoUr motion) is the motion controller upgrade project currently in progress at SOLEIL. It was initiated to maintain the facility operations by addressing the risk of hardware obsolescence in motion control but at the same time making room for complex applications requirements to face new high performance challenges. In order to achieve these considerations, SOLEIL's strategy move was to go from a single controller for all applications to two motion controllers. A first Controller GALIL DMC-4183 was chosen to succeed the previous version DMC-2182. Both controllers can be integrated in the existing architecture with little hardware and software adaptation enabling full compatibility with the existing architecture. A second controller, Delta Tau Power Brick, has been selected as a HIGH PERFORMANCE solution providing advanced functionality. The CLASSIC controller upgrade is about to be completed and the integration of Power Brick into the SOLEIL control system is ongoing. The system complexity is abstracted by embedding processing functions into low-level code and giving end-users a simple high-level interface. The work done to structure the interfacing and standardization of the controller are detailed in this paper.
*Work also supported by XT.Tran, M.Cerato, G.Renaud, E.Fonda and SAMBA Beamline staff, Delta Tau Ldt., IMO JEAMBRUN AUTOMATION, Observatory-Sciences Ldt…
 
poster icon Poster MOPGF047 [1.818 MB]  
 
MOPGF049 100Hz Data Acquisition in the TANGO Control System at the Max IV Linac TANGO, controls, linac, electron 1
 
  • P.J. Bell, V.H. Hardion, V. Michel
    MAX-lab, Lund, Sweden
 
  The MAX IV synchrotron radiation facility is currently being constructed in Lund, Sweden. A linear accelerator serves as the injector for the two storage rings and also as the source of short X ray pulses, in which mode it will operate with a 100Hz repetition rate. The controls system, based on TANGO, is required to collect and archive data from several different types of hardware at up to this 100Hz frequency. These data are used for example in offline beam diagnostics, for which they must be associated to a unique electron bunch number. To meet these requirements, the timing performance of the hardware components have been studied, and a TANGO Fast Archiver device created. The system is currently in the deployment phase and will play an important role in allowing the linac and Short Pulse Facility reach their 100Hz design goal  
poster icon Poster MOPGF049 [17.953 MB]  
 
MOPGF052 A Framework for Hardware Integration in the LHCb Experiment Control System interface, controls, experiment, detector 1
 
  • L.G. Cardoso, F. Alessio, J. Barbosa, C. Gaspar, R. Schwemmer
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • P-Y. Duval
    CPPM, Marseille, France
 
  LHCb is one of the four experiments at the LHC accelerator at CERN. For the LHCb upgrade, hundreds of new electronics boards for the central data acquisition and for the front-end readout of the different sub-detectors are being developed. These devices will need to be integrated in the Experiment Control System (ECS) that drives LHCb. Typically, they are controlled via a server running on a PC which allows the communication between the hardware registers and the experiment SCADA (WinCC OA). A set of tools was developed that provide an easy integration of the control and monitoring of the devices in the ECS. The fwHw is a tool that allows the abstraction of the device models into the ECS. Using XML files describing the structure and registers of the devices it creates the necessary model of the hardware as a data structure in the SCADA. It allows then the control and monitoring of the defined registers using their name, without the need to know the details of the hardware behind. The fwHw tool also provides the facility of defining and applying recipes - named sets of configuration parameters which can be used to easily configure the hardware according to specific needs.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF052 [0.705 MB]  
 
MOPGF056 Synchronising High-Speed Triggered Image and Meta Data Acquisition for Beamlines EPICS, data-acquisition, controls, framework 1
 
  • N. De Maio, A.P. Bark, T.M. Cobb, J.A. Thompson
    DLS, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
 
  High-speed image acquisition is becoming more and more common on beamlines. As experiments increase in complexity, the need to record parameters related to the environment at the same time increases with them. As a result, conventional systems for combining experimental meta data and images often struggle to deliver at a speed and precision that would be desirable for the experiment. We describe an integrated solution that addresses those needs, overcoming the performance limitations of PV monitoring by combining hardware triggering of an ADC card, coordination of signals in a Zebra box* and three instances of area-Detector streaming to HDF5 data. This solution is expected to be appropriate for frame rates ranging from 30Hz to 1000Hz, with the limiting factor being the maximum speed of the camera. Conceptually, the individual data streams are arranged in pipelines controlled by a master Zebra box, expecting start/stop signals on one end and producing the data collections at the other. This design ensures efficiency on the acquisition side while allowing easy interaction with higher-level applications on the other.
*T. Cobb, Y. Chernousko, I. Uzun, ZEBRA: A Flexible Solution for Controlling Scanning Experiments, Proc. ICALEPCS13, http://jacow.org/.
 
poster icon Poster MOPGF056 [0.451 MB]  
 
MOPGF058 Neutron Scattering Instrument Control System Modernization - Front-End Hardware and Software Adaption Problems TANGO, device-server, controls, detector 1
 
  • M. Drochner, L. Fleischhauer-Fuss, H. Kleines, M. Wagener, S. van Waasen
    FZJ, Jülich, Germany
 
  When the FRM-2 neutron source went into operation (2002) and many instruments were moved from the closed-down Jülich reactor to the new facility, it was agreed on a choice of front-end hardware and the TACO middleware from ESRF. To keep up with software standards, it was decided recently to switch to TACO's successor - the TANGO control software. For a unified "user experience", new graphical user interface software "NICOS-2" is being developed by the software group at FRM2. While general semantics of TACO and TANGO don't look very different at a first glance, and adaption of device servers seemed to be straightforward at first, various problems in practical operation were found. The problems were due to differences in state handling, timing behavior and error reporting. These problems, and the changes that had to be made to ensure reliable operation again, will be described.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF058 [4.001 MB]  
 
MOPGF071 Sodium Laser Guide Star Emulation laser, controls, optics, software 1
 
  • I.A. Price
    Research School of Astronomy & Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston Creek, Australia
  • R. Conan
    GMTO Corporation, Pasadena, USA
 
  In the era of extremely large telescopes (ELT) an adaptive optics (AO) system with artificial guide stars is an essential part of the optics between the source and the instrument. For the Giant Magellan Telescope these guide stars are formed by stimulating emission from Sodium atoms in the atmosphere with lasers launched from the side of the telescope. Moreover, they are resolved by the adaptive optics system so Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors record elongated spots. Cost effective proof-of-concept systems for investigating control algorithms must be built for deployment in the lab or on small telescopes. We present a hardware and software system that mimics the propagation of a single laser guide star (LGS) through the Earth's atmosphere and the optics of the Giant Magellan Telescope, using source motion and brightness modulation to simulate the source extension. A service oriented architecture allows adaptive optics scientists to construct images from different LGS asterisms and build non-real-time closed-loop control systems in high-level languages.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF071 [4.470 MB]  
 
MOPGF072 Hot Checkout for 12 GeV at Jefferson Lab status, operation, database, software 1
 
  • R.J. Slominski, T. L. Larrieu
    JLab, Newport News, Virginia, USA
 
  Funding: Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177. The U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to this manuscript.
A new hot checkout process was implemented at Jefferson Lab for the upgraded 12 GeV accelerator. The previous process proved insufficient in the fall of 2011 when a fire broke out in a septa magnet along the beam line due to a lack of communication about the status of systems. The improved process provides rigorous verification of system readiness thus protecting property while minimizing program delays. To achieve these goals, a database and web application were created to maintain an accurate list of machine components and coordinate and record verification checks by each responsible group. The process requires groups to publish checklists detailing each system check to encourage good work practice. Within groups, the process encourages two independent checks of each component: the first by a technician, and a second by the group leader. Finally, the application provides a dashboard display of checkout progress for each system and beam destination of the machine allowing for informed management decisions. Successful deployment of the new process has led to safe and efficient machine commissioning.
 
poster icon Poster MOPGF072 [3.862 MB]  
 
MOPGF098 PandA Motion Project - A Collaboration Between SOLEIL and Diamond to Upgrade Their 'Position and Acquisition' Processing Platform. interface, controls, FPGA, software 1
 
  • I.S. Uzun, T.M. Cobb, A.M. Cousins, M.T. Heron
    DLS, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
  • Y.-M. Abiven, J. Bisou, P. Monteiro, G. Renaud
    SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
 
  Synchrotron SOLEIL and Diamond Light Source are two third generation light sources located respectively in France and the UK. In the past 5 years, both facilities separately developed their own platform permitting encoder processing to synchronize motion systems and acquisition during experiments, SPIETBOX by SOLEIL and Zebra by Diamond. New operational requirements for simultaneous and multi-technique scanning, and support of multiple encoder standards have been identified by both institutes. In order to address these a collaborative project has been initiated between SOLEIL and Diamond to realize a new 'Position and Acquisition' processing platform, called PandA. The PandA project addresses current systems' limitations in term of obsolescence and need for more processing power. Its design is going to be a 1U standalone system powered by a Xilinx Zynq SoC to implement a configurable set of logic functionalities. It will provide a flexible and open solution to interface different third party hardware (detectors and motion Controllers). This paper details the organization of this collaboration, sharing technical leadership between both institutes and the status of the project.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF098 [1.953 MB]  
 
MOPGF120 CAN Over Ethernet Gateways: A Convenient and Flexible Solution to Access Low Level Control Devices interface, controls, Ethernet, software 1
 
  • G. Thomas, D. Davids
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • O. Holme
    ETH, Zurich, Switzerland
 
  CAN bus is a recommended fieldbus at CERN. It is widely used in the control systems of the experiments to control and monitor large amounts of equipment (IO devices, front-end electronics, power supplies). CAN nodes are distributed over busses that are interfaced to the computers via PCI or USB CAN interfaces. These interfaces limit the possible evolution of the Detector Control Systems (DCS). For instance, PCI cards are not compatible with all computer hardware and new requirements for virtualization and redundancy require dynamic reallocation of CAN bus interfaces to different computers. Additionally, these interfaces cannot be installed at a different location than the front-end computers. Ethernet based CAN interfaces resolve these issues, providing network access to the field busses. The Ethernet-CAN gateways from Analytica (GmbH) were evaluated to determine if they meet the hardware and software specifications of CERN. This paper presents the evaluation methodology and results as well as highlighting the benefits of using such gateways in experiment production environments. Preliminary experience with the Analytica interfaces in the DCS of the CMS experiment is presented.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF120 [3.051 MB]  
 
MOPGF125 The General Interlock System (GIS) for FAIR software, PLC, pick-up, status 1
 
  • F. Ameil, C. Betz
    GSI, Darmstadt, Germany
  • G. Cuk, I. Verstovšek
    Cosylab, Ljubljana, Slovenia
 
  The Interlock System for FAIR named General Interlock System (GIS) is part of the Machine Protection System which protects the accelerator from damage by misled beams. The GIS collects various Interlock sources hardware signals from up to 60 distributed remote I/O stations through PROFINET to a central PLC CPU. Thus a bit-field is build and sent to the interlock processor via a simple Ethernet point-to-point connection. Additional software Interlock sources can be picked up by the Interlock Processor via UDP/IP protocol. The Interlock System for FAIR project was divided into 2 development phases. Phase A contains the interlock signal gathering (HW and SW) and a status viewer. Phase B entails the fully functional interlock logic (support for dynamic configuration), interface with Timing System, interlock signal acknowledging, interlock signal masking, archiving and logging. The realization of the phase A will be presented in this paper.  
 
MOPGF126 A Modified Functional Safety Method for Predicting False Beam Trips and Blind Failures in the Design Phase of the ESS Beam Interlock System diagnostics, proton, operation, interface 1
 
  • R. Andersson, E. Bargalló, A. Monera Martinez, A. Nordt
    ESS, Lund, Sweden
 
  As accelerators are becoming increasingly powerful, the requirement of a reliable machine protection system is apparent to avoid beam-induced damage to the equipment. A missed detection of a hazard is undesirable as it could lead to equipment damage on very short time scales. In addition, the number of false beam trips, leading to unnecessary downtime, should be kept at a minimum to achieve user satisfaction. This paper describes a method for predicting and mitigating these faults, based on the architecture of the system. The method is greatly influenced by the IEC61508 standard for functional safety for the industry and implements a Failure Mode, Effects, and Diagnostics Analysis (FMEDA). It is suggested that this method is applied at an early stage in the design phase of a high-power accelerator, so that possible protection and mitigation can be suggested and implemented in the interlock system logic. The method described in this paper is currently applied at the European Spallation Source and the results follow from the analysis on the Beam Interlock System of this facility.  
 
MOPGF132 Building an Interlock: Comparison of Technologies for Constructing Safety Interlocks PLC, FPGA, controls, interlocks 1
 
  • T. Hakulinen, F. Havart, P. Ninin, F. Valentini
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  Interlocks are an important feature of both personnel and machine protection systems for mitigating risks inherent in operation of dangerous equipment. The purpose of an interlock is to secure specific equipment or entire systems under well defined conditions in order to prevent accidents from happening. Depending on specific requirements for the level of reliability, availability, speed, and cost of the interlock, various technologies are available. Different approaches are discussed, in particular in the context of personnel safety systems, which have been built or tested at CERN during the last few years. Technologies discussed include examples of programmable devices, PLCs and FPGAs, as well as wired logic based on relays and special logic cards.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF132 [1.249 MB]  
 
MOPGF135 Upgrade of the Trigger Synchronisation and Distribution System of the Beam Dumping System of the Large Hadron Collider operation, dumping, controls, kicker 1
 
  • N. Magnin, A. Antoine, E. Carlier, V. Chareyre, S. Gabourin, A. Patsouli, N. Voumard
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  Various upgrades were performed on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Beam Dumping System (LBDS) during Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) at CERN, in particular to the Trigger Synchronisation and Distribution System (TSDS): A redundant direct connection from the LHC Beam Interlock System to the re-trigger lines of the LBDS was implemented, a fully redundant powering architecture was set up, and new Trigger Synchronisation Unit cards were deployed over two separate crates instead of one. These hardware changes implied the adaptation of the State Control and Surveillance System and an improvement of the monitoring and diagnosis systems, like the various Internal Post Operation Check (IPOC) systems that ensure that, after every beam dump event, the LBDS worked as expected and is 'as good as new' for the next LHC beam. This paper summarises the changes performed on the TSDS during LS1, highlights the upgrade of the IPOC systems and presents the problems encountered during the commissioning of TSDS before the LHC Run II.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF135 [0.948 MB]  
 
MOPGF153 Beam Instrumentation and Data Acquisition for CRYRING@ESR controls, ion, instrumentation, linac 1
 
  • T. Hoffmann, H. Bräuning, R. Haseitl, R. Lonsing, P.B. Miedzik, T. Milosic, A. Petit, A. Reiter
    GSI, Darmstadt, Germany
 
  At FAIR the re-assembly of the well known CRYRING accelerator, formerly hosted by Manne Siegbahn Laboratory (MSL) Stockholm, is currently in progress. This compact low energy heavy ion synchrotron and experimental storage ring will be a testing platform for all control system (CS) concepts decided on for FAIR. The CRYRING CS will be based on the system originally developed by CERN which combines the JAVA based application level LSA (LHC Software Architecture) , the data acquisition level FESA (Front-End Software Architecture) and the White Rabbit based timing system. All parts have been enhanced with GSI specific functionality. In preparation for the commissioning of CRYRING later in 2015 all required beam instrumentation (BI) equipment including the software is now under development. The data acquisition (DAQ) concepts for the various instruments is presented, with emphasis on the seamless integration into the overall CS. For standard BI systems, such as digital imaging, profile and intensity measurement, VME and IndustryPC based DAQ systems are used. For beam position monitoring a new hardware strategy which combines the microTCA and FMC (FPGA mezzanine card) form factors is under evaluation.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF153 [2.028 MB]  
 
MOPGF158 Sirius Control System: Design, Implementation Strategy and Measured Performance controls, interface, operation, network 1
 
  • J.P.S. Martins, M. Bacchetti, E.P. Coelho, R.F. Curcio, J.G.R.S. Franco, R.P. Lisboa, P.H. Nallin, A.R.D. Rodrigues, L.D.S. Sachinelli, M. E. Silva
    LNLS, Campinas, Brazil
 
  Sirius is a new 3 GeV synchrotron light source currently being designed at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. The Control System will be distributed and digitally connected to all equipment in order to avoid analog signal cables. A three-layer control system will be used. The equipment layer uses RS485 serial networks, running at 10Mbps, with a light proprietary protocol, over a proprietary hardware, in order to achieve good performance. The middle layer, interconnecting these serial networks, is based on Beaglebone Black single board computer and commercial switches. Operation layer will be composed of PC's running EPICS client programs. Special topology will be used for Orbit Feedback with a dedicated commercial 10Gbps switch. The lower layers software implementation may use either (a) distributed EPICS conventional servers, the traditional approach, or (b) centralized EPICS server, using data servers and light proprietary protocol over Ethernet. Both cases use the same hardware and can run concurrently, sharing the control network. Measured performance with these two approaches will be presented.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF158 [1.447 MB]  
 
MOPGF161 LANSCE Control System Upgrade Status and Challenges controls, EPICS, FPGA, neutron 1
 
  • M. Pieck, D. Baros, E. Björklund, J.A. Faucett, J.G. Gioia, J.O. Hill, P.S. Marroquin, J.D. Paul, J.D. Sedillo, F.E. Shelley, H.A. Watkins
    LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract W-7405-ENG-36. LA-UR-15-27880
The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linear accelerator drives five user facilities: Isotope Production, Proton Radiography, Ultra-Cold Neutrons, Weapons Neutron Research, and Neutron Scattering. In 2011, we started an ambitious project to refurbish key elements of the LANSCE accelerator that have become obsolete or were near end-of-life. The control system went through an upgrade process that affected different areas of LANSCE. Many improvements have been made but funding challenges and LANSCE operational commitments have delayed project deliverables. In this paper, we will discuss our upgrade choices, what we have accomplished so far, what we have learned about upgrading the existing control system and what challenges we still face.
 
poster icon Poster MOPGF161 [1.069 MB]  
 
MOPGF171 Active Magnetic Bearings System Upgrade for LHC Cryogenic Cold Compressor, Radiations Mitigation Project (R2E) controls, operation, radiation, software 1
 
  • M. Pezzetti
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • P. Arpaia
    Naples University Federico II, Science and Technology Pole, Napoli, Italy
  • M. Girone
    U. Sannio, Benevento, Italy
  • M. Hubatka
    MECOS AG, Winterthur, Switzerland
 
  During the normal operation of the Large Hadron Collider, the high hadron flux level induced several Single Event Errors (SEE failure caused by a particle passing through) to the standard electronics installed. Such events perturbed LHC normal operation. As a consequence, a mitigation plan to minimise radiation-induced failures and optimise LHC operation was started: R2E mitigation project. This paper will deal with the mitigation problem for LHC/P8 equipment and the main improvements for the equipment in P4, with special focus on the controllers for the Active Magnetic Bearings used in the IHI-LINDE cold compressors. In addition, a new approach based on frequency response analysis to assess the cold compressor mechanical quality will be presented. The hardware and software design, implemented to increase the global reliability of the system, will be highlighted. A corresponding experiment protocol was developed at CERN in collaboration with the MECOS Company and the Universities of Sannio and Napoli Federico II. Preliminary experimental results showing the performance of the proposed approach on a case study for the cold compressor in P4 will be finally reported.  
 
TUB3O02 Iterative Development of the Generic Continuous Scans in Sardana controls, experiment, software, data-acquisition 1
 
  • Z. Reszela, G. Cuní, C.M. Falcón Torres, D. Fernandez-Carreiras, C. Pascual-Izarra, M. Rosanes Siscart
    ALBA-CELLS Synchrotron, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain
 
  Sardana* is a software suite for Supervision, Control and Data Acquisition in scientific installations. It aims to reduce cost and time of design, development and support of the control and data acquisition systems. Sardana is used in several synchrotrons where continuous scans are the desired way of executing experiments**. Most experiments require an extensive and coordinated control of many aspects like positioning, data acquisition, synchronization and storage. Many successful ad-hoc solutions have already been developed, however they lack generalization and are hard to maintain or reuse. Sardana, thanks to the Taurus*** based applications, allows the users to configure and control the scan experiments. The MacroServer, a flexible python based sequencer, provides parametrizable turn-key scan procedures. Thanks to the Device Pool controllers interfaces, heterogeneous hardware can be easily plug into Sardana and their elements used during scans and data acquisitions. Development of the continuous scans is an ongoing iterative process and its current status is described in this paper.
* http://sardana-controls.org** D. Fernandez-Carreiras, Synchronization of Motion and Detectors and Cont. Scans as the Standard Data Acquisition Technique, ICALEPCS2015*** http://taurus-scada.org
 
slides icon Slides TUB3O02 [3.169 MB]  
 
TUD3O04 The Virtual European XFEL Accelerator software, controls, simulation, operation 1
 
  • R. Kammering, W. Decking, L. Fröhlich, O. Hensler, T. Limberg, S.M. Meykopff, K.R. Rehlich, V. Rybnikov, J. Wilgen, T. Wilksen
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
 
  The ambitious commissioning plans for the European XFEL require that many of the high-level controls are ready from the beginning. The idea arose to create a virtual environment to carry out such developments and tests in advance, to test interfaces, software in general and the visualisation of the variety of components. Based on the experiences and on the systems that are already in operation at the FLASH facility for several years, such a virtual environment is being created. The system can already simulate most of the key components of the upcoming accelerator. Core of the system is an event synchronized data acquisition system (DAQ). The interfaces of the DAQ system towards the device level, as well as to the high-level side is utilising the same software stack as the production system does. Thus, the software can be developed and used interchangeably between the virtual and the real machine. This allows to test concepts, interfaces and identify problems and errors at an early stage. In this paper the opportunities arising from the operation of such a virtual machine will be presented. The limits in terms of the resulting complexity and physical relationships will also be shown.  
slides icon Slides TUD3O04 [3.225 MB]  
 
WEB3O01 Open Source Contributions and Using Osgi Bundles at Diamond Light Source software, interface, controls, operation 1
 
  • M.W. Gerring, A. Ashton, R.D. Walton
    DLS, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
 
  This paper presents the involvement of Diamond Light Source (DLS) with the open source community, the Eclipse Science Working Group and how DLS is changing to share software development effort better between groups. The paper explains moving from product-based to bundle-based software development process which lowers reinvention, increases reuse and reduces software development and support costs. This paper details specific ways in which DLS are engaging with the open source community and changing the way that research institutions deliver open source code.  
slides icon Slides WEB3O01 [0.936 MB]  
 
WEB3O03 Disruptor - Using High Performance, Low Latency Technology in the CERN Control System controls, framework, software, detector 1
 
  • M. Gabriel, R. Gorbonosov
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  Accelerator control systems process thousands of concurrent events per second, which adds complexity to their implementation. The Disruptor library provides an innovative single-threaded approach, which combines high performance event processing with a simplified software design, implementation and maintenance. This open-source library was originally developed by a financial company to build a low latency trading exchange. In 2014 the high-level control system for CERN experimental areas (CESAR) was renovated. CESAR calculates the states of thousands of devices by processing more than 2500 asynchronous event streams. The Disruptor was used as an event-processing engine. This allowed the code to be greatly simplified by removing the concurrency concerns. This paper discusses the benefits of the programming model encouraged by the Disruptor (simplification of the code base, performance, determinism), the design challenges faced while integrating the Disruptor into CESAR as well as the limitations it implies on the architecture.  
slides icon Slides WEB3O03 [0.950 MB]  
 
WEM303 Virtualisation within the Control System Environment at the Australian Synchrotron controls, synchrotron, EPICS, network 1
 
  • C.U. Felzmann, N. Hobbs, A. C. Starritt
    SLSA, Clayton, Australia
 
  Virtualisation technologies significantly improve efficiency and availability of computing services while reducing the total cost of ownership. Real-time computing environments used in distributed control systems require special consideration when it comes to server and application virtualisation. The EPICS environment at the Australian Synchrotron comprises more than 500 interconnected physical devices; their virtualisation holds great potential for reducing risk and maintenance. An overview of the approach taken by the Australian Synchrotron, the involved hardware and software technologies as well as the configuration of the virtualisation eco-system is presented, including the challenges, experiences and lessons learnt.  
slides icon Slides WEM303 [1.235 MB]  
poster icon Poster WEM303 [0.958 MB]  
 
WEM307 Custom Hardware Platform Based on Intel Edison Module controls, Ethernet, embedded, EPICS 1
 
  • D. Pedretti, D. Bortolato, F. Gelain, M.G. Giacchini, D. Marcato, M. Montis, S. Pavinato, J.A. Vásquez
    INFN/LNL, Legnaro (PD), Italy
  • M.A. Bellato, R. Isocrate
    INFN- Sez. di Padova, Padova, Italy
 
  The Computer-on-Module approach makes cutting edge technology easily accessible and lowers the entry barriers to anyone prototyping and developing embedded systems. Furthermore, it is possible to add all the system specific functionalities to the generic PC functions which are readily available in an off-the-shelf core module reducing the time to market and enhancing the creativity of system engineers. The purpose of this paper is to show a custom hardware platform based on the tiny and low power Intel Edison Compute Module, which uses a 22nm Intel processing core and contains connectivity elements to ensure device-to-device and device-to-cloud connectivity. The Intel Edison carrier board designed is expected to act as a local intelligent node, a readily available custom EPICS*,** IOC for extending the control reach to small appliances in the context of the SPES project. The board acts as an Ethernet to RS232/RS422 interface translator with Power-Over-Ethernet supply and network booting as key features of this platform. The x86 architecture of the Edison makes standard Linux software deployment straightforward. Currently the board is in prototyping stage.
*http://www.aps.anl.gov/epics**http://www.lnl.infn.it/~epics
 
slides icon Slides WEM307 [1.052 MB]  
poster icon Poster WEM307 [2.495 MB]  
 
WEM308 A Multi-Modal Human-Machine-Interface for Accelerator Operation and Maintenance Applications controls, operation, status, interface 1
 
  • R. Bacher
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
 
  The advent of advanced mobile, gaming and augmented reality devices provides users with novel interaction modalities. Today's accelerator control applications do not provide features like speech, finger and hand gesture recognition or even gaze detection. Their look-and-feel and handling are typically optimized for mouse-based interactions and are not well suited for the specific requirements of more complex interaction modalities. This paper describes the conceptual design and implementation of an intuitive single-user, multi-modal human-machine interface for accelerator operation and maintenance applications. The interface seamlessly combines standard actions (mouse), actions associated with 2D single/multi-finger gestures (touch sensitive display) and 3D single/multi-finger and hand gestures (motion controller), and spoken commands (speech recognition system). It will be an integral part of the web-based, platform-neutral Web2cToGo framework belonging to the Web2cToolkit suite and will be applicable for desktop and notebook computers, tablet computers and smartphones, and even see-through augmented reality glasses.  
slides icon Slides WEM308 [0.399 MB]  
poster icon Poster WEM308 [0.815 MB]  
 
WEPGF013 Increasing Availability by Implementing Software Redundancy in the CMS Detector Control System controls, software, detector, status 1
 
  • L. Masetti, A. Andronidis, O. Chaze, C. Deldicque, M. Dobson, A.D. Dupont, D. Gigi, F. Glege, J. Hegeman, M. Janulis, R.J. Jiménez Estupiñán, F. Meijers, E. Meschi, S. Morovic, C. Nunez-Barranco-Fernandez, L. Orsini, A. Petrucci, A. Racz, P. Roberts, H. Sakulin, C. Schwick, B. Stieger, S. Zaza, P. Zejdl
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • J.M. Andre, R.K. Mommsen, V. O'Dell, P. Zejdl
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
  • U. Behrens
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
  • J. Branson, S. Cittolin, A. Holzner, M. Pieri
    UCSD, La Jolla, California, USA
  • G.L. Darlea, G. Gomez-Ceballos, C. Paus, K. Sumorok, J. Veverka
    MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
  • S. Erhan
    UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA
  • O. Holme
    ETH, Zurich, Switzerland
 
  Funding: Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF).
The Detector Control System (DCS) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment ran with high availability throughout the first physics data-taking period of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This was achieved through the consistent improvement of the control software and the provision of a 24-hour expert on-call service. One remaining potential cause of significant downtime was the failure of the computers hosting the DCS software. To minimize the impact of these failures after the restart of the LHC in 2015, it was decided to implement a redundant software layer for the control system where two computers host each DCS application. By customizing and extending the redundancy concept offered by WinCC Open Architecture (WinCC OA), the CMS DCS can now run in a fully redundant software configuration. The implementation involves one host being active, handling all monitoring and control tasks, with the second host running in a minimally functional, passive configuration. Data from the active host is constantly copied to the passive host to enable a rapid switchover as needed. This paper describes details of the implementation and practical experience of redundancy in the CMS DCS.
 
poster icon Poster WEPGF013 [1.725 MB]  
 
WEPGF015 Drivers and Software for MicroTCA.4 controls, interface, software, Linux 1
 
  • M. Killenberg, M. Heuer, M. Hierholzer, L.P. Petrosyan, Ch. Schmidt, N. Shehzad, G. Varghese, M. Viti
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
  • T. Kozak, P. Prędki, J. Wychowaniak
    TUL-DMCS, Łódź, Poland
  • S. Marsching
    Aquenos GmbH, Baden-Baden, Germany
  • M. Mehle, T. Sušnik, K. Žagar
    Cosylab, Ljubljana, Slovenia
  • A. Piotrowski
    FastLogic Sp. z o.o., Łódź, Poland
 
  Funding: This work is supported by the Helmholtz Validation Fund HVF-0016 'MTCA.4 for Industry'.
The MicroTCA.4 crate standard provides a powerful electronic platform for digital and analogue signal processing. Besides excellent hardware modularity, it is the software reliability and flexibility as well as the easy integration into existing software infrastructures that will drive the widespread adoption of the new standard. The DESY MicroTCA.4 User Tool Kit (MTCA4U) comprises three main components: A Linux device driver, a C++ API for accessing the MicroTCA.4 devices and a control system interface layer. The main focus of the tool kit is flexibility to enable fast development. The universal, expandable PCI Express driver and a register mapping library allow out of the box operation of all MicroTCA.4 devices which are running firmware developed with the DESY board support package. The tool kit has recently been extended with features like command line tools and language bindings to Python and Matlab.
 
poster icon Poster WEPGF015 [0.536 MB]  
 
WEPGF018 Service Asset and Configuration Management in ALICE Detector Control System controls, detector, software, database 1
 
  • M. Lechman, A. Augustinus, P.M. Bond, P.Ch. Chochula, A.N. Kurepin, O. Pinazza
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • A.N. Kurepin
    RAS/INR, Moscow, Russia
  • M. Lechman
    IP SAS, Bratislava, Slovak Republic
  • O. Pinazza
    INFN-Bologna, Bologna, Italy
 
  ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is one of the big LHC (Large Hadron Collider) detectors at CERN. It is composed of 19 sub-detectors constructed by different institutes participating in the project. Each of these subsystems has a dedicated control system based on the commercial SCADA package "WinCC Open Architecture" and numerous other software and hardware components delivered by external vendors. The task of the central controls coordination team is to supervise integration, to provide shared services (e.g. database, gas monitoring, safety systems) and to manage the complex infrastructure (including over 1200 network devices and 270 VME and power supply crates) that is used by over 100 developers around the world. Due to the scale of the control system, it is essential to ensure that reliable and accurate information about all the components - required to deliver these services along with relationship between the assets - is properly stored and controlled. In this paper we will present the techniques and tools that were implemented to achieve this goal, together with experience gained from their use and plans for their improvement.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF018 [11.373 MB]  
 
WEPGF024 Interfacing EPICS to the Widespread Platform Management Interface IPMI interface, EPICS, controls, monitoring 1
 
  • M. Ritzert
    Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany
 
  Funding: This work has been supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) under Grant Identifier 05H12VHH.
The Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI) is a standardized interface to management functionalities of computer systems. The data provided typically includes the readings of monitoring sensors, such as fan speeds, temperatures, power consumption, etc. It is provided not only by servers, but also by uTCA crates that are often used to host an experiment's control and readout system. Therefore, it is well suited to monitor the health of the hardware deployed in HEP experiments. In addition, the crates can be controlled via IPMI with functions such as triggering a reset, or configuring IP parameters. We present the design and functionality of an EPICS module to interface to IPMI that is based on ipmitool. It supports automatic scanning for IPMI sensors and filling the PV metadata (units, meaning of status words in mbbi records) from the IPMI sensor information. Most importantly, the IPMI-provided alarm thresholds are automatically placed in the PV for easy implementation of an alarm system to monitor IPMI hardware.
For the DEPFET Collaboration.
 
poster icon Poster WEPGF024 [2.362 MB]  
 
WEPGF025 Data Driven Simulation Framework framework, simulation, controls, software 1
 
  • S. Roy Chaudhuri, A.S. Banerjee, P. Patwari
    Tata Research Development and Design Centre, Pune, India
  • L. Van den Heever
    SKA South Africa, National Research Foundation of South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa
 
  Funding: Tata Research Development and Design Centre, TCSL.
Control systems for Radio Astronomy projects such as MeerKAT* require testing functionality of different parts of the Telescope even when the system is not fully developed. Usage of software simulators in such scenarios is customary. Projects build simulators for subsystems such as Dishes, Beamformers and so on to ensure the correctness of a) their interface to the control system b) logic written to coordinate and configure them. However, such simulators are developed as one-offs, even when they implement similar functionality. This leads to duplicated effort impacting large projects such as Square Kilometer Array**. We leverage the idea of data driven software development and conceptualize a simulation framework that reduces the simulator development effort, to mitigate this: 1) capturing all the necessary information through instantiation of a well-defined simulation specification model, 2) configuring a reusable engine that performs the required simulation functions based on the instantiated and populated model provided to it as input. The results of a PoC for such a simulation framework implemented in the context of Giant Meter-wave Radio Telescope*** are presented.
*MeerKAT CAM Design Description, DNo M1500-0000-006, Rev 2, July 2014**A.R. Taylor, "The Square Kilometre Array", Proceedings IAU Symposium, 2012***www.gmrt.ncra.tifr.res.in
 
poster icon Poster WEPGF025 [0.672 MB]  
 
WEPGF031 The Evolution of the Simulation Environment in ALMA simulation, software, network, operation 1
 
  • T.C. Shen, S.A. Fuica, A. Ovando, N. Saez, R. Soto, T.I. Staig, G. Velez
    ALMA Observatory, Santiago, Chile
  • J.P.A. Ibsen
    ESO, Santiago, Chile
 
  The Atacama Large Millimeter /sub millimeter Array (ALMA) has entered into operation phase since 2014. This transition changed the priorities within the observatory, in which, most of the available time will be dedicated to science observations at the expense of technical time that software testing used to have available in abundance. The scarcity of the technical time surfaces one of the weakest points in the existent infrastructure available for software testing: the simulation environment of the ALMA software. The existent simulation focuses on the functionality aspect but not on the real operation scenarios with all the antennas. Therefore, scalability and performance problems introduced by new features or hidden in the current accepted software cannot be verified until the actual problem explodes during operation. Therefore, it was planned to design and implement a new simulation environment, which must be comparable, or at least, be representative of the production environment. In this paper we will review experiences gained and lessons learnt during the design and implementation of the new simulated environment.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF031 [1.398 MB]  
 
WEPGF046 Towards a Second Generation Data Analysis Framework for LHC Transient Data Recording framework, data-analysis, operation, extraction 1
 
  • S. Boychenko, C. Aguilera-Padilla, M. Dragu, M.A. Galilée, J.C. Garnier, M. Koza, K.H. Krol, R. Orlandi, M.C. Poeschl, T.M. Ribeiro, K.S. Stamos, M. Zerlauth
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • M. Zenha-Rela
    University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
 
  During the last two years, CERNs Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and most of its equipment systems were upgraded to collide particles at an energy level twice higher compared to the first operational period between 2010 and 2013. System upgrades and the increased machine energy represent new challenges for the analysis of transient data recordings, which have to be both dependable and fast. With the LHC having operated for many years already, statistical and trend analysis across the collected data sets is a growing requirement, highlighting several constraints and limitations imposed by the current software and data storage ecosystem. Based on several analysis use-cases, this paper highlights the most important aspects and ideas towards an improved, second generation data analysis framework to serve a large variety of equipment experts and operation crews in their daily work.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF046 [0.497 MB]  
 
WEPGF052 Development of the J-PARC Time-Series Data Archiver using a Distributed Database System, II distributed, database, EPICS, status 1
 
  • N. Kikuzawa, A. Yoshii
    JAEA/J-PARC, Tokai-Mura, Naka-Gun, Ibaraki-Ken, Japan
  • H. Ikeda, Y. Kato
    JAEA, Ibaraki-ken, Japan
 
  The linac and the RCS in J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) have over 64000 EPICS records, providing enormous data to control much equipment. The data has been collected into PostgreSQL, while we are planning to replace it with HBase and Hadoop, a well-known distributed database and a distributed file system that HBase depends on. In the previous conference it was reported that we had constructed an archive system with a new version of HBase and Hadoop that cover a single point of failure, although we realized there were some issues to make progress into a practical phase. In order to revise the system with resolving the issues, we have been reconstructing the system with replacing master nodes with reinforced hardware machines, creating a kickstart file and scripts to automatically set up a node, introducing a monitoring tool to early detect flaws without fail, etc. In this paper these methods are reported, and the performance tests for the new system with accordingly fixing some parameters in HBase and Hadoop, are also examined and reported.  
 
WEPGF056 Flyscan: a Fast and Multi-technique Data Acquisition Platform for the SOLEIL Beamlines TANGO, synchrotron, network, detector 1
 
  • N. Leclercq, J. Bisou, F. Blache, F. Langlois, S. Lê, K. Medjoubi, C. Mocuta, S. Poirier
    SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
 
  SOLEIL is continuously optimizing its 29 beamlines in order to provide its users with state of the art synchrotron radiation based experimental techniques. Among the topics addressed by the related transversal projects, the enhancement of the computing tools is identified as a high priority task. In this area, the aim is to optimize the beam time usage providing the users with a fast, simultaneous and multi-technique scanning platform. The concrete implementation of this general concept allows the users to acquire more data in the same amount of beam time. The present paper provides the reader with an overview of so call 'Flyscan' project currently under deployment at SOLEIL. It notably details a solution in which an unbounded number of distributed actuators and sensors share a common trigger clock and deliver their data into temporary files. The latter are immediately merged into common file(s) in order to make the whole experiment data available for on-line processing and visualization. Some application examples are also commented in order to illustrate the advantages of the Flyscan approach.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF056 [2.335 MB]  
 
WEPGF072 Parameters Tracking and Fault Diagnosis base on NoSQL Database at SSRF storage-ring, distributed, database, injection 1
 
  • Y.B. Yan, Z.C. Chen, L.W. Lai, Y.B. Leng
    SINAP, Shanghai, People's Republic of China
 
  As a user facility, the reliability and stability are very important. Besides using high-reliability hardware, the rapid fault diagnosis, data mining and predictive analytic s are also effective ways to improve the efficiency of the accelerator. A beam data logging system was built at SSRF, which was based on NoSQL database. The logging system stores beam parameters under some predefined conditions. The details of the system will be reported in this paper.  
 
WEPGF074 FPGA Firmware Framework for MTCA.4 AMC Modules interface, framework, FPGA, LLRF 1
 
  • Ł. Butkowski, T. Kozak, B.Y. Yang
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
  • P. Prędki
    TUL-DMCS, Łódź, Poland
  • R. Rybaniec
    Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Electronic Systems, Warsaw, Poland
 
  Many of the modules in specific hardware architectures use the same or similar communication interfaces and IO connectors. MicroTCA (MTCA.4) is one example of such a case. All boards: communicate with the central processing unit (CPU) over PCI Express (PCIe), send data to each other using Multi-Gigabit Transceivers (MGT), use the same backplane resources and have the same Zone3 IO or FPGA mezzanine card (FMC) connectors. All those interfaces are connected and implemented in Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) chips. It makes possible to separate the interface logic from the application logic. This structure allows to reuse already done firmware for one application and to create new application on the same module. Also, already developed code can be reused in new boards as a library. Proper structure allows the code to be reused and makes it easy to create new firmware. This paper will present structures of firmware framework and scripting ideas to speed up firmware development for MTCA.4 architecture. European XFEL control systems firmware, which uses the described framework, will be presented as example.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF074 [0.702 MB]  
 
WEPGF080 Encoder Interface for NSLS-II Beam Line Motion Scanning Applications interface, controls, status, FPGA 1
 
  • R.A. Kadyrov, J.H. De Long, K. Ha, S. So, E. Stavitski
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  The variety of motion control applications on existing and future NSLS-II beam lines demand custom control electronics developed to meet specific needs and ease integration to existing systems. Thus an encoder interface was designed for a number of detection techniques that require fly-scan applications. This design fits in a 2U chassis and can handle up to 4 incremental quadrature encoders with a digital RS-422A interface and output frequencies up to 10 MHz. The logic, based on Xilinx Virtex-6 FPGA, processes signals from an encoder, associates it with accelerator timestamp and sends the data to a server using TCP/IP stack, with the server side running an EPICS IOC. Several filtering and compression techniques are also applied. The device then re-translates the interface signals for the motion controller, allowing the device to be installed between encoder and motion controller with no interference to the system. The hardware leverages the NSLS-II BPM Digital Front End (DFE) board with Virtex-6 FPGA and periphery. The design harmoniously complements the family of NSLS-II equipment sharing same mechanical and electrical platform.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF080 [4.670 MB]  
 
WEPGF081 Em# Platform: Towards a Hardware Interface Standardization Scheme controls, FPGA, interface, electronics 1
 
  • O. Matilla, J.A. Avila-Abellan, M. Broseta, G. Cuní, D. Fernandez-Carreiras, A. Ruz, J. Salabert, X. Serra-Gallifa
    ALBA-CELLS Synchrotron, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain
 
  Low current measurements developments have been pointed out as strategic for ALBA synchrotron. From the first day of operation of the seven Beamlines currently in operation ALBA Em electrometer this has been successfully used. Today, the two new beamlines of Phase 2 that are being constructed and the new end stations have required specification changes in terms of increased accuracy, capability of synchronization, timestamping, management of large buffers and high performance closed-loop implementation. The scheme of full custom hardware design has been abandoned. ALBA Em# project approach has been based in the selection of industry standard interfaces: FMC boards design for custom needs, FMC carrier over PCIe using SPEC board from CERN under OHWR license, and Single Board Computer using PCIe to implement interfaces with the control system. This Paper describes the new design of the Electrometers at Alba, suited for the newer requirements, more flexible, performing and maintainable, which profits from the know-how acquired with previous versions and suits the new data acquisition paradigm emerged with the standardization of quick continuous scans and data acquisition.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF081 [0.230 MB]  
 
WEPGF089 CERN Open Hardware Experience: Upgrading the Diamond Fast Archiver FPGA, network, interface, feedback 1
 
  • I.S. Uzun, M.G. Abbott
    DLS, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
 
  Diamond Light Source developed and integrated the Fast Archiver into its Fast Orbit Feedback communication network in 2009. It enabled synchronous capture and archive of the entire position data in real-time from all Electron Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) and X-RAY BPMs . The FA Archiver solution has also been adopted by SOLEIL and ESRF. However, the obsolescence of the existing PCI Express based FPGA board from Xilinx and continuing interest from community forced us to look for a new hardware platform while keeping the back compatibility with the existing Linux kernel driver and application software. This paper reports our experience with using the PCIe SPEC board from CERN Open Hardware initiative as the new FA Archiver platform. Implementation of the SPEC-based FA Archiver has been successfully completed and recently deployed at ALBA in Spain.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF089 [0.576 MB]  
 
WEPGF093 CXv4, a Modular Control System controls, network, software, GUI 1
 
  • D. Bolkhovityanov, P.B. Cheblakov, F.A. Emanov
    BINP SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia
 
  CX control system is used at VEPP-5 and several other BINP facilities. CX version 4 is designed to provide more flexibility and enable interoperability with other control systems. In addition to device drivers, most of its components are implemented in a modular fashion, including data access at both client and server sides. The server itself is a library. This approach allows clients to access several different control systems simultaneously and natively (without any gateways). CXv4 servers are able to provide data access to clients from diverse CS architectures/protocols, subject to appropriate network module being loaded. The server library, coupled with "null link" client-server access module, allows to create standalone monolythic programs for specific small applications (such as test benches and device test screens/utilities) using the same ready code from large-scale control system but without its complexity. CXv4 design principles and solutions are discussed and first deployment results are presented.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF093 [0.667 MB]  
 
WEPGF102 Solving the Synchronization Problem in Multi-Core Embedded Real-Time Systems real-time, operation, controls, embedded 1
 
  • F. Hoguin, S. Deghaye
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  Multi-core CPUs have become the standard in embedded real-time systems. In such systems, where several tasks run simultaneously, developers can no longer rely on high priority tasks blocking low priority tasks. In typical control systems, low priority tasks are dedicated to receiving settings from the control room, and high priority real-time tasks, triggered by external events, control the underlying hardware based on these settings. Settings' correctness is of paramount importance and they must be modified atomically from a real-time task point of view. This is not feasible in multi-core environments using classic double-buffer approaches, mainly because real-time tasks can overlap, preventing buffer swaps. Other common synchronization solutions involving locking critical sections introduce unpredictable jitter on real-time tasks, which is not acceptable in CERN's control system. A lock-free, wait-free solution to this problem based on a triple buffer, guaranteeing atomicity no matter the number of concurrent tasks, is presented. The only drawback is potential synchronization delay on contention. This solution has been implemented and tested in CERN's real-time C++ framework.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF102 [0.433 MB]  
 
WEPGF115 LabVIEW EPICS Program for Measuring BINP HLS of PAL-XFEL controls, LabView, EPICS, distributed 1
 
  • H. J. Choi, K.H. Gil, H.-S. Kang, S.H. Kim, K.W. Seo, Y.J. Suh
    PAL, Pohang, Kyungbuk, Republic of Korea
 
  In PAL-XFEL, a 4th generation light source, the HLS (Ultrasonic-type Hydrostatic Levelling System) developed at BINP (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics) in Russia was installed and operated in all parts of PAL-XFEL in order to maintain observations of the vertical change building floor by the ground sinking and uplifting. For this, a HLS measuring program was written using NI LabVIEW and an EPICS IOC Server was built using the CA Lab which has been developed at BESSY (Berlin Electron Storage Ring Society for Synchrotron Radiation) in Germany. The CA Lab was improved and verified in order to confirm that it could support EPICS BASE libraries V3.14.12, and EPICS CA Client and that the EPICS IOC Server could be easily constructed by CA Lab in a 64-bit LabVIEW. This made Multi-core CPU (Multi-core Processor / Multi-thread Program) resource of 64bit Computer System (64bit Hardware PC / 64bit Windows OS / 64bit LabVIEW Multi-thread Programming) to be 100 percent utilized. This study proposes a configuration process for the HLS measuring program algorithm and a building process for the EPICS IOC Server by using CA Lab.  
 
WEPGF127 A Generic Timing Software for Fast Pulsed Magnet Systems at CERN kicker, timing, controls, software 1
 
  • C. Chanavat, M. Arruat, E. Carlier, N. Magnin
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  At CERN, fast pulsed magnet (kicker) systems are used to inject, extract, dump and excite beams. Depending on their operational functionalities and as a result of the evolution of controls solutions over time, the timing controls of these systems were based on hybrid hardware architectures that have resulted in a large disparity of software solutions. In order to cure this situation, a Kicker Timing Software (KiTS), based on a modular hardware and software architecture, has been developed with the objective to increase the homogeneity of fast and slow timings control for all types of fast pulsed magnet systems. The KiTS uses a hardware abstraction layer and a configurable software model implemented within the Front-End Software Architecture (FESA) framework. It has been successfully deployed in the control systems of the different types of kicker systems at CERN like for the PS continuous transfer, the SPS injection and extraction, the SPS tune measurement and the LHC injection.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF127 [38.180 MB]  
 
WEPGF129 CERN timing on PXI and cRIO platforms timing, Linux, software, controls 1
 
  • A. Rijllart, O.O. Andreassen, J. Blanco Alonso
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  Given the time critical applications, the use of PXI and cRIO platforms in the accelerator complex at CERN, require the integration into the CERN timing system. In this paper the present state of integration of both PXI and cRIO platforms in the present General Machine Timing system and the White Rabbit Timing system, which is its successor, is described. PXI is used for LHC collimator control and for the new generation of control systems for the kicker magnets on all CERN accelerators. The cRIO platform is being introduced for transient recording on the CERN electricity distribution system and has potential for applications in other domains, because of its real-time OS, FPGA backbone and hot swap modules. The further development intended and what type of applications are most suitable for each platform, will be discussed.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF129 [1.548 MB]  
 
WEPGF136 Development of iBeacon Based Equipment Inventory System at STAR Experiment experiment, site, toolkit, detector 1
 
  • J. Fujita, M.G. Cherney
    Creighton University, Omaha, NE, USA
 
  An inventory system using iBeacon technology has been developed. Using a specially written iOS app, makes the location of the equipment easier to a workers during the routine access to the experiment. The use of iBeacons and iOS devices allow us to distinguish one equipment rack from another very easily. Combined with 2D barcode, the use of iBeacons may provide better inventory management of the equipment for experiments.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF136 [2.594 MB]  
 
WEPGF150 A HTML5 Web Interface for JAVA DOOCS Data Display interface, controls, network, operation 1
 
  • E. Sombrowski, R. Kammering, K.R. Rehlich
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
 
  JAVA DOOCS Data Display (JDDD) is the standard tool for developing control system panels for the FLASH facility and European XFEL. The panels are mainly started on DESY campus. For remote monitoring and expert assistance a secure, fast and light-weight access method is required. One possible solution is using HTML5 as transport protocol, because it is available on many common platforms including mobile ones. For this reason an HTML5 version of JDDD, running in a Tomcat application server, was developed. WebSocket technology is used to transfer the panel image to the browser. In the other direction, mouse events are sent back from the browser to the Tomcat server. Now thousands of existing JDDD panels can be accessed from remote using standard web technology. No special browser plugins are required. This article discusses the general issues of the web-based interaction with the control system such as security, usability, network traffic and scalability, and presents the WebSocket approach.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF150 [1.028 MB]  
 
THHA2O02 The LASNCE FPGA Embedded Signal Processing Framework FPGA, framework, software, interface 1
 
  • J.O. Hill
    LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.
During the replacement of some LANSCE LINAC instrumentation systems a common architecture for timing system synchronized embedded signal processing systems was developed. The design follows trends of increasing levels of electronics system integration; a single commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) board assumes the roles of analog-to-digital conversion and advanced signal processing while also providing the LAN attached EPICS IOC functionality. These systems are based on agile FPGA-based COTS VITA VPX boards with an VITA FMC mezzanine site. The signal processing is primarily developed at a high level specifying numeric algorithms in software source code to be integrated together with COTS signal processing intellectual property components for synthesis of hardware implementations. This paper will discuss the requirements, the decision point selecting the VPX together with the FMC industry standards, the benefits along with costs of system integrating multi-vendor COTS components, the design of some of the signal processing algorithms, and the benefits along with costs of embedding the EPICS IOC within an FPGA.
 
slides icon Slides THHA2O02 [2.108 MB]  
 
THHB2O01 Preliminary Design of a Real-Time Hardware Architecture for eRHIC Ethernet, controls, real-time, software 1
 
  • R.J. Michnoff, P. Cerniglia, M.R. Costanzo, R.L. Hulsart, J.P. Jamilkowski, W.E. Pekrul, Z. Sorrell, C. Theisen
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy.
The 3.8 km circumference Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL has been in operation since 2000. An electron-ion collider (eRHIC), which is in the design phase, plans to use one of the existing ion rings and new electron rings constructed in the existing tunnel to provide collisions of up to 21.2 GeV electrons with up to 100 GeV gold ions, 250 GeV polarized protons, as well as other species. Many new real-time systems will be required to satisfy the needs of eRHIC, including over 2000 beam position monitors, 1000 beam loss monitors, 18 current monitors, feedback systems, controls for about 10,000 power supplies, machine protection system, new beam timing systems, and more. The selected architecture must be flexible, expandable, cost-effective, reliable, and easy to maintain. Interface with existing and new accelerator timing systems is required, and compatibility with existing infrastructure and equipment must be maintained. Embedded modules based on the Xilinx Zynq gate array, with direct Ethernet connection and on-board Linux, housed in multi-slot chassis (VME, VPX, TCA, etc.) is under consideration. Preliminary design concepts for the architecture will be presented.
 
slides icon Slides THHB2O01 [7.735 MB]  
 
THHC2O02 Component Database for APS Upgrade database, software, interface, storage-ring 1
 
  • S. Veseli, N.D. Arnold, J. Carwardine, G. Decker, D.P. Jarosz, N. Schwarz
    ANL, Argonne, Ilinois, USA
 
  The Advanced Photon Source Upgrade (APS-U) project will replace the existing APS storage ring with a multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice to provide extreme transverse coherence and extreme brightness x-rays to its users. As the time to replace the existing storage ring accelerator is of critical concern, an aggressive one-year removal/installation/testing period is being planned. To aid in the management of the thousands of components to be installed in such a short time, the Component Database (CDB) application is being developed with the purpose to identify, document, track, locate, and organize components in a central database. Three major domains are being addressed: Component definitions (which together make up an exhaustive "Component Catalog"), Designs (groupings of components to create subsystems), and Component Instances ('Inventory'). Relationships between the major domains offer additional "system knowledge" to be captured that will be leveraged with future tools and applications. It is imperative to provide sub-system engineers with a functional application early in the machine design cycle. Topics discussed in this paper include the initial design and deployment of CDB, as well as future development plans.  
slides icon Slides THHC2O02 [1.953 MB]  
 
THHC3O05 National Ignition Facility (NIF) Experiment Interface Consolidation and Simplification to Support Operational User Facility experiment, framework, software, status 1
 
  • A.D. Casey, E.J. Bond, B.A. Conrad, M.S. Hutton, P.D. Reisdorf, S.M. Reisdorf
    LLNL, Livermore, California, USA
 
  Funding: This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344
The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a 192-beam 1.8 MJ ultraviolet laser system designed to support high-energy-density science. NIF can create extreme states of matter, including temperatures of 100 million degrees and pressures that exceed 100 billion times Earth's atmosphere. At these temperatures and pressures, scientists explore the physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes and thermonuclear burn. In the past year, NIF has transitioned to an operational facility and significant focus has been placed on how users interact with the experimental tools. The current toolset was developed with a view to commissioning the NIF and thus allows flexibility that most users do not require. The goals of this effort include enhancing NIF's external website, easier proposal entry, reducing both the amount and frequency of data the users have to enter, and simplifying user interactions with the tools while reducing the reliance on custom software. This paper will discuss the strategies adopted to meet the goals, highlight some of the user tool improvements that have been implemented and planned future directions for the toolset.
 
slides icon Slides THHC3O05 [3.163 MB]  
 
FRA3O01 Past, Present and Future of the ASKAP Monitoring and Control System controls, monitoring, software, EPICS 1
 
  • M. Marquarding
    CASS, Epping, Australia
 
  The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) is CSIRO's new radio telescope currently under construction and commissioning at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in the Mid West region of Western Australia. The first six antennas equipped with the first generation (or Mark-I) Phased Array Feeds (PAF) have been in commissioning since 2013. Twelve of the second generation (Mark-II) PAFs are expected to hit the ground late this year leading into the start of the Early Science program. This paper will present the current status of the ASKAP project, including some exciting results coming from the commissioning activities. This will encompass the status of the monitoring and control system, named the Telescope Operating System (TOS), future developments and some of the lessons learned during the early stages of the integration and commissioning phase.