Keyword: interlocks
Paper Title Other Keywords Page
MOPGF112 Measurements, Alarms and Interlocks in the Vacuum Control System of the LHC vacuum, electronics, radiation, controls 1
 
  • G. Pigny, F. Antoniotti, J-P. Boivin, N. Chatzigeorgiou, J. Gama, P. Gomes, P. Krakówski, H.F. Pereira
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  In the LHC beam pipes and cryostats, the pressure measurement covers a wide range, from 1500 mbar down to 10-11 mbar and even lower. If vacuum deteriorates, alarm signals are generated and sent to other systems, e.g. cryogenics, accelerating cavities, kicker magnets, and beam interlock. In addition, an unacceptable pressure rise in beam pipes generates interlocks to close the adjacent sector valves, thus isolating the sector, so that the pressure rise does not propagate. This paper describes the measurement chains, the alarms and interlocks logic used in the vacuum control system of the LHC. We analyze the possible signal degradation caused by ionizing radiation or due to cable length, shielding and grounding. The weaknesses of the existing vacuum measurement system are pointed out, and a prospective for improvement of the conditioning electronics is proposed. During the first LHC long shut down, several corrections were applied; the results of the tests after commissioning are also presented.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF112 [1.725 MB]  
 
MOPGF132 Building an Interlock: Comparison of Technologies for Constructing Safety Interlocks PLC, FPGA, controls, hardware 1
 
  • T. Hakulinen, F. Havart, P. Ninin, F. Valentini
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  Interlocks are an important feature of both personnel and machine protection systems for mitigating risks inherent in operation of dangerous equipment. The purpose of an interlock is to secure specific equipment or entire systems under well defined conditions in order to prevent accidents from happening. Depending on specific requirements for the level of reliability, availability, speed, and cost of the interlock, various technologies are available. Different approaches are discussed, in particular in the context of personnel safety systems, which have been built or tested at CERN during the last few years. Technologies discussed include examples of programmable devices, PLCs and FPGAs, as well as wired logic based on relays and special logic cards.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF132 [1.249 MB]  
 
TUC3I01 Machine Protection and Interlock System for Large Research Instruments operation, controls, superconducting-magnet, extraction 1
 
  • R. Schmidt
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  Major research instruments such as accelerators and fusion reactors operate with large amount of power and energy stored in beams and superconducting magnets. Highly reliable Machine Protection systems are required to operate such instruments without damaging equipment in case of failure. The increased interest in protection is related to the increasing beam power of high-power proton accelerators such as ISIS, SNS, ESS and the PSI cyclotron, to the large energy stored in the beam (in particular for hadron colliders such as LHC) and to the stored energy in magnet systems such as for ITER and LHC. Machine Protection includes process and equipment monitoring, a system to safely stop operation (e.g. dumping the beam or extracting the energy stored in the magnets) and an interlock system for highly reliable communication between protection systems. Depending on the application, the reaction of the protection function to failures must be very fast (for beam protection systems down to some us). In this paper an overview of the challenges for protection is given, and examples of interlock systems and their use during operation are presented.  
slides icon Slides TUC3I01 [1.883 MB]  
 
WEPGF154 Visualization of Interlocks with EPICS Database and EDM Embedded Windows EPICS, controls, database, PLC 1
 
  • E. Tikhomolov
    TRIUMF, Canada's National Laboratory for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Vancouver, Canada
 
  The control system for TRIUMF's upgraded secondary beam line M20 was implemented by using a PLC and one of many EPICS IOCs running on a multi-core Dell server. Running the IOC on a powerful machine rather than on a small dedicated computer has a number of advantages such as fast code execution and the availability of a large amount of memory. A large EPICS database can be loaded into the IOC and used for visualization of the interlocks implemented in the PLC. The information about interlock status registers, text messages, and the names of control and interlock panels are entered into a relational database by using a web browser. Top-level EPICS schematics are generated from the relational database. For visualization the embedded windows available in the Extensible Display Manager (EDM) are the EPICS clients, which retrieve interlock status information from the EPICS database. A set of interlock panels is the library, which can be used to show any chains of interlocks. If necessary, a new interlock panel can be created by using the visualization tools provided with EDM. This solution, in use for more than 3 years, has proven to be reliable and very flexible.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF154 [1.155 MB]