Keyword: laser
Paper Title Other Keywords Page
MOC3O03 Automatic FEL Optimization at FERMI FEL, electron, feedback, undulator 1
 
  • G. Gaio, M. Lonza
    Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Italy
 
  FERMI is a seeded Free Electron Laser (FEL) located in Trieste, Italy. The machine setup and optimization is a non-trivial problem due to the high sensitivity of the FEL process to several machine parameters. In particular, the electron bunch trajectory and its spatial overlap with the seed laser beam represent one of the key aspects to optimize and then preserve during machine operation. In order to ease the FEL tuning and to guarantee a long term stability of the photon beam, a software process integrated into the feedback systems performs automatic trajectory optimization of both the seed laser and the electron beams. The algorithm implementation, the results and the operational issues are presented.  
slides icon Slides MOC3O03 [8.957 MB]  
 
MOC3O06 The Laser Megajoule Facility: The Computational System PARC simulation, software, experiment, interface 1
 
  • S. Vermersch
    CEA, LE BARP cedex, France
 
  The Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) is a 176-beam laser facility, located at the CEA CESTA Laboratory near Bordeaux (France). It is designed to deliver about 1.4 MJ of energy to targets, for high energy density physics experiments, including fusion experiments. The assembly of the first line of amplification (8 beams) was achieved in October 2014. A computational system, PARC has been developed and is under deployment to automate the laser setup process, and accurately predicts the laser energy and temporal shape. PARC is based on the computer simulation code MIRO. For each LMJ shot, PARC determines the characteristics of the laser injection system required to achieve the desired main laser output, provide parameter checking needed for all equipment protections, determines the required diagnostic setup, and supplies post-shot data analysis and reporting. This paper presents the first results provided by PARC. It also describe results obtained with the PARC demonstrator during the first experiments conducted on the LMJ facility.  
slides icon Slides MOC3O06 [4.980 MB]  
 
MOC3O07 Low Level RF Control Implementation and Simultaneous Operation of Two FEL Undulator Beamlines at FLASH operation, controls, LLRF, undulator 1
 
  • V. Ayvazyan, S. Ackermann, J. Branlard, B. Faatz, M.K. Grecki, O. Hensler, S. Pfeiffer, H. Schlarb, Ch. Schmidt, M. Scholz, S. Schreiber
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
  • A. Piotrowski
    FastLogic Sp. z o.o., Łódź, Poland
 
  The Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is a user facility delivering femtosecond short radiation pulses in the wavelength range between 4.2 and 45 nm using the SASE principle. The tests performed in the last few years have shown that two FLASH undulator beamlines can deliver FEL radiation simultaneously to users with a large variety of parameters such as radiation wavelength, pulse duration, intra-bunch spacing etc. FLASH has two injector lasers on the cathode of the gun to deliver different bunch trains with different charges, needed for different bunch lengths. Because the compression settings depend on the charge of bunches the low level RF system needs to be able to supply different compression for both beamlines. The functionality of the controller has been extended to provide intra-pulse amplitude and phase changes while maintaining the RF field amplitude and the phase stability requirements. The RF parameter adjustment and tuning for RF gun and accelerating modules can be done independently for both laser systems. Having different amplitudes and phases within the RF pulse in several RF stations simultaneous lasing of both systems has been demonstrated.  
slides icon Slides MOC3O07 [4.640 MB]  
 
MOD3O03 Shot Rate Improvement Strive for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) alignment, controls, target, diagnostics 1
 
  • G.K. Brunton, G.A. Bowers, A.D. Conder, J.-M.G. Di Nicola, P. Di Nicola, M.A. Fedorov, B.T. Fishler, R. Fleming, D.H. Kalantar, G. Lau, D.G. Mathisen, V.J. Miller Kamm, V. Pacheu, M. Paul, R.K. Reed, J. Rouse, R.J. Sanchez, M.J. Shaw, E.A. Stout, S. Weaver, E.F. Wilson
    LLNL, Livermore, California, USA
 
  Funding: This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.
The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental facility with 192 beams capable of delivering 1.8 megajoules of 500-terawatt ultraviolet laser energy. The energy, temperatures and pressures capable of being generated allow scientists the ability to generate conditions similar to the center of the sun and explore physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes and thermonuclear burn. NIF has transitioned to a 24x7 operational facility and in the past year significant focus has been placed on increasing the volume of experimental shots capable of being conducted so as to satisfy the demand from the wide range of user groups. The goal for the current fiscal year is a shot rate of 300 (> 50% increase over the previous year), increasing to a sustainable rate of 400 the year after. The primary focus areas to achieve these increases are; making more shot time available, improvements in experiment scheduling, and reducing the duration of a shot cycle. This paper will discuss the control system improvements implemented and planned to reduce the shot cycle duration and the systematic approaches taken to identify and prioritize them.
 
slides icon Slides MOD3O03 [3.415 MB]  
 
MOPGF026 Laser Beam Profiling and Further Improvements to the FHI FEL FEL, electron, detector, cavity 1
 
  • H. Junkes, W. Schöllkopf, M. Wesemann
    FHI, Berlin, Germany
 
  A mid-infrared FEL has been established at the Fritz-Haber-Institut in Berlin. It is used for spectroscopic investigations of molecules, clusters, nanoparticles and surfaces. The oscillator FEL is operated with 15 - 50 MeV electrons from a normal-conducting S-band linac equipped with a gridded thermionic gun and a chicane for controlled bunch compression. The EPICS software framework was choosen to build the control system for this facility. In an effort to support the various experimenters two different Laser Beam Profiling cameras have been integrated. Here, the areadetector framework with genicam integration is used. The control system was also expanded with fast digitizers (SIS3316) but connected via Ethernet instead of using a VMEbus crate controller to get a higher flexibility. A iPad app for monitoring completes the enhancement. This paper presents design and implementation aspects of the upgrade, its capabilities, and lessons learned during the development.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF026 [15.827 MB]  
 
MOPGF032 Installation of a Hot-Swappable Spare Injector Laser System for the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source controls, electron, timing, cathode 1
 
  • S.C. Alverson, G.W. Brown, F.-J. Decker, S. Gilevich, S. Vetter
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
 
  LCLS is a facility for generation of very short duration, highly intense x-ray pulses which requires an extremely reliable photocathode electron source. In order to maintain high up-time (>95%) for the experimenters, operations rely on a maintenance program for active laser components as well as on built-in redundancy in case of failure. To accomplish this, a duplicate laser system was installed, allowing for quick swap between the active system and the spare in the event of a malfunction or for planned maintenance. As an added bonus, this redundant system provides additional possibilities for science as both laser systems can also be run to the cathode simultaneously to create multiple particle bunches. Diagnostics were put in place to maintain both special and temporal overlap and allow for the fast switching between systems by operations personnel while still remaining within the safety envelope. This was done for both the primary UV drive laser as well as the secondary IR "heater" laser. This paper describes the installation challenges and design architecture for this backup laser system.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF032 [1.773 MB]  
 
MOPGF039 TIP: An Umbrella Application for all SCADA-Based Applications for the CERN Technical Infrastructure controls, operation, interface, framework 1
 
  • F. Varela, Ph. Gayet, P. Golonka, M. Gonzalez-Berges, J. Pache, P. Sollander
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • L. Goralczyk
    AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
 
  The WinCC Open Architecture (OA) SCADA package and the controls frameworks (UNICOS, JCOP) developed at CERN were successfully used to implement many critical control systems at CERN. In the recent years, the supervision and the controls of many technical infrastructure systems (electrical distribution, cooling and ventilation, etc.) were rewritten to use this standard environment. Operators at the Technical Infrastructure desk, who monitor these systems, are forced to continuously switch between the applications that allow them to monitor these infrastructure systems. The Technical Infrastructure Portal (TIP) was designed and is being developed to provide centralized access to all technical infrastructure systems and extend their functionality by linking to a powerful localization system based on GIS. Furthermore, it provides an environment for operators to develop views that aggregate data from different sources, like cooling and electricity.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF039 [1.392 MB]  
 
MOPGF051 ELI-ALPS Control System Status Report controls, software, TANGO, beam-transport 1
 
  • L.J. Fulop, S. Brockhauser, S. Farkas, V. Hanyecz, M. Kiss, M.T. Koncz, Á. Mohácsi, K. Nelissen, L. Schrettner, B. Szalai, P. Szasz, C. Turner
    ELI-ALPS, Szeged, Hungary
 
  Funding: The ELI-ALPS project (GOP-1.1.1-12/B-2012-000, GINOP-2.3.6-15-2015-00001) is supported by the European Union and co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund.
ELI-ALPS will provide a wide range of attosecond pulses which will be used for performing chemical, biological, physical or medical experiments by international research groups. It is one pillar of the first international laser facility for the scientific user communities. ELI-ALPS uses the TANGO Controls framework to build up the central control system and to integrate the autonomous subsystems regarding monitoring and control. It will be also used for the implementation of some autonomous systems' control system while others will be implemented differently. The central control system and the integration strategy of the autonomous systems is designed. The centralization and integration needs are surveyed and the requirements are collected. Prototypes have been developed to clarify the requirements and to test the designs. Requirements elicitation, designing and prototype development follows a Lean-Agile approach and includes several fields: device drivers and simulators; integration logic; central supervision, archiving, logging and error recovery; graphical user interfaces and so on.
 
poster icon Poster MOPGF051 [0.973 MB]  
 
MOPGF071 Sodium Laser Guide Star Emulation controls, hardware, optics, software 1
 
  • I.A. Price
    Research School of Astronomy & Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston Creek, Australia
  • R. Conan
    GMTO Corporation, Pasadena, USA
 
  In the era of extremely large telescopes (ELT) an adaptive optics (AO) system with artificial guide stars is an essential part of the optics between the source and the instrument. For the Giant Magellan Telescope these guide stars are formed by stimulating emission from Sodium atoms in the atmosphere with lasers launched from the side of the telescope. Moreover, they are resolved by the adaptive optics system so Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors record elongated spots. Cost effective proof-of-concept systems for investigating control algorithms must be built for deployment in the lab or on small telescopes. We present a hardware and software system that mimics the propagation of a single laser guide star (LGS) through the Earth's atmosphere and the optics of the Giant Magellan Telescope, using source motion and brightness modulation to simulate the source extension. A service oriented architecture allows adaptive optics scientists to construct images from different LGS asterisms and build non-real-time closed-loop control systems in high-level languages.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF071 [4.470 MB]  
 
MOPGF145 Commissioning and Design of the Machine Protection System for Fermilab's Fast Facility status, controls, interface, electron 1
 
  • L.R. Carmichael, D.J. Crawford, N. Liu, R. Neswold, A. Warner, J.Y. Wu
    Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois, USA
 
  The Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) Facility will provide an electron beam with up to 3000 bunches per macro-pulse, 5Hz repetition rate and 300 MeV beam energy. The completed machine will be capable of sustaining an average electron beam power of close to 15KW at the bunch charge of 3.2nC. A robust Machine Protection System (MPS) capable of interrupting the beam within a macro-pulse and that interfaces well with new and existing controls system infrastructure has been developed to mitigate and analyze faults related to this relatively high damage potential. This paper describes the component layers of the MPS system, including a FPGA-based Permit Generator and Laser Pulse Controller, the Beam Loss Monitoring system design as well as the controls and related work done to date.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF145 [1.844 MB]  
 
MOPGF174 Laser - Driven Hadron Therapy Project hadron, ion, target, proton 1
 
  • F. Scarlat, A.M. Scarisoreanu
    INFLPR, Bucharest - Magurele, Romania
  • Fl. Scarlat
    Bit Solutions, Bucharest, Romania
  • N. Verga
    Univerity of Medicine and Pharmacy 'Carol Davila', Bucharest, Romania
 
  The laser beam (10 PW, 15 fs, 150 J, 1023 W/cm2) generated by APOLLON Laser System, now under construction on Magurele Platform near Bucharest may also be applied in radiotherapy. Starting from this potential application, location of malign tumors in patient may be situated, e.g., superficial (≤5 cm), semi-deep (5-10 cm) and profound (>10-40 cm). This paper presents the main physical parameters of a research project for a therapy based on hadrons controlled by laser, for the treatment of superficial and semi-deep tumors. Energies required for pin-pointing the depth of such tumors are 50-117 MeV for protons and 100'216 MeV/u for carbon ions. Hadron beams with such energies can be generated by the mechanism Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA). Besides, the control systems to provide the daily absorbed dose from the direct and indirect ionizing radiation at the level of the malign tumor of 2 Gy in 1 or 2 minutes with expanded uncertainty of 3 % are presented.  
 
TUB3O04 The LMJ System Sequences Adaptability (French MegaJoule Laser) controls, target, GUI, database 1
 
  • Y. Tranquille-Marques, J. Fleury, J. Nicoloso
    CEA, LE BARP cedex, France
 
  The French Atomic and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA : Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives) is currently building the Laser MegaJoule facility. In 2014, the first 8 beams and the target area were commissioned and the first physics campaign (a set of several shots) was achieved. On the LMJ, each shot requires more or less the same operations except for the settings that change from shot to shot. The supervisory controls provide five semi-automated sequence programs to repeat and schedule actions on devices. Three of them are now regularly used to drive the LMJ. Sequence programs need to have different qualities such as flexibility, contextual adaptability, reliability and repeatability. Currently, the calibration shots sequence drives 328 actions towards local control systems. However, this sequence is already dimensioned to drive 22 bundles, which will lead to manage almost 5300 actions. This paper introduces the organization of the control system used by sequence programs, the sequence adjustments files, the grafcets of sequences, the GUIs, the software and different tools used to control the facility.  
slides icon Slides TUB3O04 [11.268 MB]  
 
TUD3O02 Extreme Light Infrastructure, Beamlines - Control System Architecture for the L1 Laser controls, LabView, framework, software 1
 
  • J. Naylon, K. Kasl, T. Mazanec
    ELI-BEAMS, Prague, Czech Republic
  • A. Greer, C. Mayer
    OSL, Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • B. Rus
    Czech Republic Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics, Prague, Czech Republic
 
  Funding: Work supported by the European Regional Development Fund and the European Social Fund under Operational Programs ECOP and RDIOP.
The ELI-Beamlines facility aims to provide a selection of high-energy and high repetition-rate TW-PW femtosecond lasers driving high intensity XUV/X-ray and accelerated particle secondary sources for applications in materials, medical, nuclear and high-field physics sectors. The highest repetition rate laser in the facility will be the L1 laser, producing 1 kHz, 20 fs laser pulses of 200 mJ energy. This laser is based entirely on picosecond chirped-pulse parametric amplification and solid-state pump lasers. The high repetition rate combined with kW pump powers and advanced technologies calls for a highly automated, reliable and flexible control system. Current progress on the L1 control system is discussed, focussing on the architecture, software and hardware choices. Special attention is given to the LabVIEW-EPICS framework that was developed for the ELI Beamlines lasers. This framework offers comprehensive and scalable EPICS integration while allowing the full range of LabVIEW real-time and FPGA embedded targets to be leveraged in order to provide adaptable, high-performance control and rapid development.
 
slides icon Slides TUD3O02 [3.301 MB]  
 
WEA3O01 The TANGO Controls Collaboration in 2015 TANGO, controls, device-server, experiment 1
 
  • A. Götz, J.M. Chaize, T.M. Coutinho, J.L. Pons, E.T. Taurel, P.V. Verdier
    ESRF, Grenoble, France
  • G. Abeillé
    SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
  • S. Brockhauser, L.J. Fulop
    ELI-ALPS, Szeged, Hungary
  • M.O. Cernaianu
    IFIN-HH, Bucharest - Magurele, Romania
  • I.A. Khokhriakov
    HZG, Geesthacht, Germany
  • R. Smareglia
    INAF-OAT, Trieste, Italy
  • A. Vazquez-Ortero
    ELI-BEAMS, Prague, Czech Republic
 
  This paper presents the latest news from the TANGO collaboration. TANGO is being used in new domains. The three ELI pillars - ELI-Beamlines, ELI-ALPS and ELI-NP in Czech Republic, Hungary and Romania respectively have selected TANGO for many of their control systems. In ELI-Beamlines and ELI-Alps, TANGO will play the role of integrating all the hardware and turn-key systems (some delivered with EPICS or Labview) into one integrated system. In ELI-NP, the HPLS and LBTS will be controlled using TANGO, while the GBS will be controlled using EPICS. On the experimental side, ELI-NP will use both TANGO and EPICS control systems. TANGO will be extended with new features required by the laser community. These features will include nanosecond time-stamping. The latest major release of TANGO V9 includes the following features - data pipes, enumerated types, dynamic commands and forwarded attributes. The collaboration has been extended to include the new members and to provide a sustainable source of resources through collaboration contracts. A new website (http://www.tango-controls.org/) has been designed which improves the communication within the community.  
slides icon Slides WEA3O01 [2.339 MB]  
 
WEC3O05 Timing System for the HAPLS/L3 ELI Project timing, controls, interface, Ethernet 1
 
  • P. Camino, D. Monnier-Bourdin
    Greenfield Technology, Massy, France
  • M.A. Drouin, J. Naylon
    ELI-BEAMS, Prague, Czech Republic
  • C. Haefner, G.W. Johnson, S.J. Telford
    LLNL, Livermore, California, USA
  • B. Rus
    Czech Republic Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics, Prague, Czech Republic
 
  The High Repetition-Rate Advanced Petawatt Laser System (HAPLS) forms part of the European Union's Extreme Light Infrastructure Beamlines project (ELI-Beamlines) which will be the first international laser research infrastructure of its kind. HAPLS will generate peak powers greater than one petawatt at a repetition rate of 10 Hz with 30fs wide pulses. ELI will enable unprecedented techniques for many diverse areas of research. HAPLS requires a high-precision timing system that operates either independently or synchronized with ELI's system. Greenfield Technology, a producer of mature picosecond timing systems for several years, has been hired by LLNL* to provide just such a timing system. It consists of a central Master Timing Generator (MTG) that generates and transmits serial data streams over an optical network that synchronizes local multi-channel delay generators which generate trigger pulses to a resolution of 1ps. The MTG is phase-locked to an external 80 MHz reference that ensures a jitter of less than 10ps. The various qualities and functions of this timing system are presented including the LabVIEW interface and precision phase locking to the 80MHz reference.
*LLNL is operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.
 
slides icon Slides WEC3O05 [2.252 MB]  
 
WEC3O06 ERL Time Management System timing, interface, controls, operation 1
 
  • P. K. Kankiya, T.A. Miller, B. Sheehy
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy.
The Energy Recovery LINAC (ERL) at BNL is an R&D project. A timing system was developed in conjunction with other available timing systems in order to operate and synchronize instruments at the ERL. This paper describes the time management software which is responsible for automating the delay configuration based on beam power and instrument limitations, for maintaining beam operational parameters, and respond to machine protection system.
 
slides icon Slides WEC3O06 [4.145 MB]  
 
WEPGF038 A Flexible System for End-User Data Visualisation, Analysis Prototyping and Experiment Logbook controls, data-acquisition, free-electron-laser, electron 1
 
  • R. Borghes, V. Chenda, G. Kourousias, M. Lonza, M. Prica, M. Scarcia
    Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Italy
 
  Experimental facilities like synchrotrons and free electron lasers, often aim at well defined data workflows tightly integrated with their control systems. Still such facilities are also service providers to visiting scientists. The hosted researchers often have requirements different than those present in the established processes. The most evident needs are those for i) flexible experimental data visualisation, ii) rapid prototyping of analysis methods, and iii) electronic logbook services. This paper reports on the development of a software system, collectively referred to as DonkiTools, that aims at satisfying the aforementioned needs for the synchrotron ELETTRA and the free electron laser FERMI. The design strategy is outlined and includes topics regarding: dynamic data visualisation, Python scripting of analysis methods, integration with the TANGO distributed control system, electronic logbook with automated metadata reporting, usability, customization, and extensibility. Finally a use case presents a full deployment of the system, integrated with the FermiDAQ data collection system, in the free electron laser beamline EIS-TIMEX.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF038 [1.011 MB]  
 
FRA3O02 The Laser Magajoule Facility: Control System Status Report controls, target, diagnostics, interface 1
 
  • J. Nicoloso
    CEA/DAM/DIF, Arpajon, France
 
  The Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) is a 176-beam laser facility, located at the CEA CESTA Laboratory near Bordeaux (France). It is designed to deliver about 1.4 MJ of energy to targets, for high energy density physics experiments, including fusion experiments. The commissioning of the first bundle of 8 beams was achieved in October 2014. Commissioning of next bundles is on the way. The paper gives an overview of the general control system architecture, which is designed around the industrial SCADA PANORAMA, supervising about 500 000 control points, using 250 virtual machines on the high level and hundreds of PCs and PLCs on the low level. The focus is on the rules and development guidelines that allowed smooth integration for all the subsystems delivered by a dozen of different contractors. The integration platform and simulation tools designed to integrate the hardware and software outside the LMJ facility are also described. Having such tools provides the ability of integrating the command control subsystems regardless the co-activity issues encountered on the facility itself. That was the key point for success.