Keyword: monitoring
Paper Title Other Keywords Page
MOA3O01 SKA Telescope Manager Project Status Report controls, interface, software, TANGO 1
 
  • L.R. Brederode
    SKA South Africa, National Research Foundation of South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa
  • A. Marassi
    INAF-OAT, Trieste, Italy
  • S. Riggi
    INAF-OACT, Catania, Italy
 
  Funding: SKA South Africa National Research Foundation of South Africa Department of Science and Technology 3rd Floor, The Park, Park Road Pinelands Cape Town South Africa 7405.
The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be the world's largest radio telescope once it is complete and will use hundreds of thousands of receivers, spanning Africa and Australia to survey the sky in unprecedented detail. The SKA will be ground breaking in many respects such as image resolution, sensitivity, survey speed, data processing and size to name a few. The SKA Telescope Manager Consortium is currently designing the SKA Phase 1 (SKA1) Telescope Manager Element that will orchestrate the SKA Observatory and associated telescopes. In this paper, we report on the current status of the SKA1 Telescope Manager pre-construction project, the development process and its high-level architecture.
 
slides icon Slides MOA3O01 [2.713 MB]  
 
MOD3O02 Continuous Delivery at SOLEIL software, operation, controls, Linux 1
 
  • G. Abeillé, A. Buteau, X. Elattaoui, S. Lê
    SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
  • G. Boissinot
    ZENIKA, Paris, France
 
  IT Department of Synchrotron SOLEIL* is structured along of a team of software developers responsible for the development and maintenance of all software from hardware controls up to supervision applications. With a very heterogonous environment such as, several software languages, strongly coupled components and an increasing number of releases, it has become mandatory to standardize the entire development process through a 'Continuous Delivery approach'; making it easy to release and deploy on time at any time. We achieved our objectives by building up a Continuous Delivery system around two aspects, Deployment Pipeline** and DevOps***. A deployment pipeline is achievable by extensively automating all stages of the delivery process (the continuous integration of software, the binaries build and the integration tests). Another key point of Continuous Delivery is also a close collaboration between software developers and system administrators, often known as the DevOps movement. This paper details the feedbacks on this Continuous Delivery approach has been adopted, modifying daily development team life and give an overview of the future steps.
*http://www.synchrotron-soleil.fr/.**http://martinfowler.com/bliki/DeploymentPipeline.html***https://sdarchitect.wordpress.com/2012/07/24/understanding-devops-part-1-defining-devops/.
 
slides icon Slides MOD3O02 [1.882 MB]  
 
MOD3O06 Interface Management for SKA Telescope Manager interface, controls, operation, TANGO 1
 
  • P.S. Swart, G.M. le Roux
    SKA South Africa, National Research Foundation of South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa
  • A. Marassi, R. Smareglia
    INAF-OAT, Trieste, Italy
  • S. Roy Chaudhuri
    Tata Research Development and Design Centre, Pune, India
  • S. Vrcic
    NRC-Herzberg, Penticton, BC, Canada
 
  The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project is currently in the Pre-construction Phase. During this phase, the telescope subsystems are being designed. The Telescope Manager (TM) is a supervisory control and monitoring subsystem in each of the two radio telescopes of the SKA (SKA1-Low and SKA1-Mid). The TM interfaces with a number of diverse telescope subsystems. Interaction between TM and these subsystems is a major source of requirements for the TM. Careful management of TM external interfaces is therefore important. This discussion is a case study of TM interface management. Firstly, how system architectural design aspects like separation of concerns in the control hierarchy reduce telescope complexity with regards to interfaces is discussed. Secondly, the standardisation approach for monitoring and control interfaces to facilitate early elicitation of interface requirements for the TM, and to manage the diversity of interfacing subsystems is discussed. Thirdly, the relations between interface definition and requirements analysis activities, using SysML representations as an example is discussed.
* paul@ska.ac.za
 
slides icon Slides MOD3O06 [2.607 MB]  
 
MOPGF050 Tango-Kepler Integration at ELI-ALPS TANGO, controls, device-server, database 1
 
  • P. Acs, S. Brockhauser, L.J. Fulop, V. Hanyecz, M. Kiss, Cs. Koncz, L. Schrettner
    ELI-ALPS, Szeged, Hungary
 
  Funding: The ELI-ALPS project (GOP-1.1.1-12/B-2012-000, GINOP-2.3.6-15-2015-00001) is supported by the European Union and co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund.
ELI-ALPS will provide a wide range of attosecond pulses which will be used for performing experiments by international research groups. ELI-ALPS will use the TANGO Controls framework to build up the central control system and to integrate the autonomous subsystems regarding software monitoring and control. Beside a robust central and integrated control system a flexible and dynamic high level environment could be beneficial. The envisioned users will come from diverse fields including chemistry, biology, physics or medicine. Most of the users will not have programming or scripting background. Meanwhile workflow system provides visual programming facilities where the logics can be drawn, which is understandable by the potential users. We have integrated TANGO into the Kepler workflow system because it gives a lot of actors for all natural scientific fields. Moreover it has the potential for running the workflows on HPC or GRID resources. We demonstrated the usability of the development with a beamline simulation. The TANGO-Kepler integration provides an easy-to-use environment for the users therefore it can facilitate e.g. the standardization of measurements protocols as well.
 
poster icon Poster MOPGF050 [0.643 MB]  
 
MOPGF067 MeerKAT Control and Monitoring System Architecture controls, interface, network, operation 1
 
  • N. Marais
    SKA South Africa, National Research Foundation of South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa
 
  Funding: SKA South Africa, National Research Foundation of South Africa, Department of Science and Technology.
The 64-dish MeerKAT radio telescope, currently under construction, comprises several loosely coupled independent subsystems, requiring a higher level Control and Monitoring (CAM) system to operate as a coherent instrument. Many control-system architectures are bus-like, clients directly \mbox{receiving} monitoring points from Input/Output Controllers; instead a multi-layer architecture based on point-to-point Karoo Array Telescope Control Protocol (KATCP) connections is used for MeerKAT. Clients (e.g. operators or scientists) only communicate directly with the outer layer of the telescope; only telescope interactions required for the given role are exposed to the user. The layers, interconnections, and how this architecture is used to meet telescope system requirements are described. Requirements include: Independently controllable telescope subsets; dynamically allocating telescope resources to individual users or observations, preventing the control of resources not allocated to them; commensal observations sharing resources; automatic detection of, and responses to, system-level alarm events; high level operator controls and health displays; automatic execution of scheduled observations.
 
poster icon Poster MOPGF067 [60.299 MB]  
 
MOPGF088 Integrating the Measuring System of Vibration and Beam Position Monitor to Study the Beam Stability controls, data-acquisition, vacuum, network 1
 
  • C.H. Huang, Y.-S. Cheng, P.C. Chiu, K.T. Hsu, K.H. Hu, C.Y. Liao
    NSRRC, Hsinchu, Taiwan
 
  For a low emittance light source, beam orbit motion needs to be controlled within submicron for obtaining a high quality light. Magnets vibration especially quadruples will be one of the main sources to destroy the beam stability. In order to study the relationship between vibration and beam motion, it is highly desirable to use a synchronous data acquisition system which integrates measurement of vibration and beam position monitor systems especially for the coherence analysis. For a larger vibration such as earthquakes are also deleterious to beam stability or even make the beam trip due to the quench of superconducting RF cavity. A data acquisition system integrated with an earthquake detector is also quite necessary to show and archive the data on the control system. The data acquisition systems of vibration and earthquake measurement system are summarized in this report. The relationship between the beam motion and magnets vibration will also study here.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF088 [0.499 MB]  
 
MOPGF142 Development of a Network-based Personal Dosimetry System, KURAMA-micro radiation, network, operation, detector 1
 
  • M. Tanigaki
    Kyoto University, Research Reactor Institute, Osaka, Japan
  • Y. Nakanishi
    Shikoku Research Institute Inc., Kagawa, Japan
 
  As the recovery from the nuclear accident in Fukushima progresses, strong demands arise on the continuous monitoring of individual radiation exposure based on action histories in a large group, such as the residents returning to their hometown after decontamination, or the workers involved in the decomissioning of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. KURAMA-micro, a personal dosimetry system with network and positioning capability, is developed for such purpose. KURAMA-micro consists of a semiconductor dosimeter and a DAQ board based on OpenATOMS. Each unit records radiation data tagged with their measurement time and locations, and uploads the data to the server over a ZigBee-based network once each unit comes near one of the access points prepared expected activities range of users. Location data are basically obtained by a GPS unit, and an additional radio beacon scheme using ZigBee broadcast protocol is also used for the indoor positioning. The development of a proto-type KURAMA-micro is finished and a field test for the workers of a nuclear reactor under normal operation is planned in the spring of 2015.  
 
MOPGF149 Nuclotron and NICA Control System Development Status TANGO, controls, database, network 1
 
  • E.V. Gorbachev, V. Andreev, A. Kirichenko, D.V. Monakhov, S. Romanov, T.V. Rukoyatkina
    JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region, Russia
  • G.S. Sedykh, V. Volkov
    JINR/VBLHEP, Dubna, Moscow region, Russia
 
  The Nuclotron is a 6 GeV/n superconducting proton synchrotron operating at JINR, Dubna since 1993. It will be the core of the future accelerating complex NICA which is under construction now. NICA will provide collider experiments with heavy ions at nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energies of 4-11 GeV. The TANGO based control system of the accelerating complex is under development now. This paper describes its structure, main features and present status.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF149 [2.450 MB]  
 
MOPGF163 Status of the Local Monitor and Control System of SKA Dishes controls, interface, software, operation 1
 
  • S. Riggi, U. Becciani, A. Costa, A. Ingallinera, F. Schillirò, C. Trigilio
    INAF-OACT, Catania, Italy
  • V. Baldini, R. Cirami, A. Marassi
    INAF-OAT, Trieste, Italy
  • G. Nicotra, C. Nocita
    INAF IRA, Bologna, Italy
 
  The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) project aims at building the world's largest radio observatory to observe the radio sky with unprecedented sensitivity and collecting area. In the SKA1 phase of the project, two dish arrays are to be built, one in South Africa (SKA1-Mid) and the other in Western Australia (SKA1-Survey). Each antenna will be provided with a local monitor and control system, enabling remote operations to engineers and to the Telescope Manager system. In this paper we present the current status of the software system being designed to monitor and control the dish subsystem. An overview of the dish instrumentation is reported, along with details concerning the software architecture, functional interfaces, prototyping and the evaluated technologies.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF163 [1.181 MB]  
 
TUC3O03 Development and Realisation of the ESS Machine Protection Concept proton, neutron, operation, target 1
 
  • A. Nordt, R. Andersson, T. Korhonen, A. Monera Martinez, M. Zaera-Sanz
    ESS, Lund, Sweden
  • A. Apollonio, R. Schmidt
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • C. Hilbes
    ZHAW, Winterthur, Switzerland
 
  ESS is facing extremely high beam availability requirements and is largely relying on custom made, very specialised, and expensive equipment for its operation. The proton beam power with an average of 5MW per pulse will be unprecedented and its uncontrolled release can lead to serious damage of the delicate equipment, causing long shutdown periods, inducing high financial losses and, as a main point, interfering drastically with international scientific research programs relying on ESS operation. Implementing a fit-for-purpose machine protection concept is one of the key challenges in order to mitigate these risks. The development and realisation of the measures needed to implement such concept to the correct level in case of a complex facility like the ESS, requires a systematic approach, and will be discussed in this paper.  
slides icon Slides TUC3O03 [11.927 MB]  
 
TUD3O03 REMUS: The new CERN Radiation and Environment Monitoring Unified Supervision radiation, database, interface, operation 1
 
  • A. Ledeul, G. Segura, R.P.I. Silvola, B. Styczen, D. Vasques Ribeira
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  The CERN Health, Safety and Environment Unit is mandated to provide a Radiation and Environment Monitoring SCADA system for all CERN accelerators, experiments as well as the environment. In order to face the increasing demand of radiation protection and continuously assess both the conventional and the radiological impact on the environment, CERN is developing and progressively deploying its new supervisory system, called REMUS - Radiation and Environment Monitoring Unified Supervision. This new WinCC OA based system aims for an optimum flexibility and scalability, based on the experience acquired during the development and operation of the previous CERN radiation and environment supervisory systems (RAMSES and ARCON). REMUS will interface with more than 70 device types, providing about 3,000 measurement channels (approximately 500,000 tags) by end 2016. This paper describes the architecture of the system, as well as the innovative design that was adopted in order to face the challenges of heterogeneous equipment interfacing, diversity of end users and non-stop operation.  
slides icon Slides TUD3O03 [2.213 MB]  
 
WEPGF023 Controlling Camera and PDU controls, software, network, status 1
 
  • O.J. Mokone, T. Gatsi
    SKA South Africa, National Research Foundation of South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa
 
  Funding: SKA South Africa National Research Foundation of South Africa Department of Science and Technology 3rd floor, The Park Park Road Pinelands ZA ­ Cape Town 7405 +27 21 506 7300
The 64-dish MeerKAT radio telescope, currently under construction in South Africa, will become the largest and most sensitive radio telescope in the Southern Hemisphere until integrated with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). This poster will present the software solutions that the MeerKAT Control and Monitoring (CAM) team implemented to achieve control (pan, tilt, zoom and focus) of the on-site video cameras using the pelco D protocol. Furthermore this poster will present how the outlets of the PDU (Power Distribution Unit) are switched on and off using SNMP to facilitate emergency shutdown of equipment. This will include a live demonstration from site (South Africa).
 
poster icon Poster WEPGF023 [0.892 MB]  
 
WEPGF024 Interfacing EPICS to the Widespread Platform Management Interface IPMI interface, EPICS, hardware, controls 1
 
  • M. Ritzert
    Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany
 
  Funding: This work has been supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) under Grant Identifier 05H12VHH.
The Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI) is a standardized interface to management functionalities of computer systems. The data provided typically includes the readings of monitoring sensors, such as fan speeds, temperatures, power consumption, etc. It is provided not only by servers, but also by uTCA crates that are often used to host an experiment's control and readout system. Therefore, it is well suited to monitor the health of the hardware deployed in HEP experiments. In addition, the crates can be controlled via IPMI with functions such as triggering a reset, or configuring IP parameters. We present the design and functionality of an EPICS module to interface to IPMI that is based on ipmitool. It supports automatic scanning for IPMI sensors and filling the PV metadata (units, meaning of status words in mbbi records) from the IPMI sensor information. Most importantly, the IPMI-provided alarm thresholds are automatically placed in the PV for easy implementation of an alarm system to monitor IPMI hardware.
For the DEPFET Collaboration.
 
poster icon Poster WEPGF024 [2.362 MB]  
 
WEPGF028 A Self-Configurable Server for Controlling Devices Over the Simple Network Management Protocol controls, network, operation, status 1
 
  • V. Rybnikov, V. Petrosyan
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
 
  The Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is an open-source protocol that allows many manufacturers to utilize it for controlling and monitoring their hardware. More and more SNMP-manageable devices show up on the market that can be used by control systems for accelerators. Some SNMP devices are being used at the free-electron laser (FLASH) at DESY and planned to be used at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) in Hamburg, Germany. To provide an easy and uniform way of controlling SNMP devices a server has been developed. The server configuration, with respect to device parameters to control, is done during its start-up and driven by the manufacturer Management Information Base (MIB) files provided with SNMP devices. This paper gives some details of the server design, its implementation and examples of use.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF028 [3.065 MB]  
 
WEPGF032 EPICS PV MANAGEMENT AND METHOD FOR RIBF CONTROL SYSTEM EPICS, controls, database, network 1
 
  • A. Uchiyama, N. Fukunishi, M. Komiyama
    RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Japan
 
  For the RIBF project (RIKEN RI Beam Factory), the EPICS-based distributed control system is utilized on Linux and vxWorks as an embedded EPICS technology. Utilizing NAS that have a High-Availability system as a shared storage, common EPICS programs (Base, Db, and so on) are shared with each EPICS IOC. In March 2015, the control system continues to grow and consists of about 50 EPICS IOCs, and more than 100,000 EPICS records. For a large number of control hardware devices, the dependencies between EPICS records and EPICS IOCs are complicated. For example, it is not easy to know accurate device information by only the EPICS record name information. Therefore, new management system was constructed for RIBF control system to call up detailed information easily. In the system, by parsing startup script files (st.cmd) for running EPICS IOCs, all EPICS records and EPICS fields are stored into the PostgreSQL-based database. By utilizing this stored data, it is successful to develop Web-based management and search tools. In this paper the system concept, the feature of the Web-based tools for the management, is reported in detail.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF032 [6.766 MB]  
 
WEPGF065 Illustrate the Flow of Monitoring Data through the MeerKAT Telescope Control Software database, interface, network, status 1
 
  • M.J. Slabber, M.T. Ockards
    SKA South Africa, National Research Foundation of South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa
 
  Funding: SKA-SA National Research Foundation (South Africa)
The MeerKAT telescope, under construction in South Africa, is comprised of a large set of elements. The elements expose various sensors to the Control and Monitoring (CAM) system, and the sampling strategy set by CAM per sensor varies from several samples a second to infrequent updates. This creates a substantial volume of sensor data that needs to be stored and made available for analysis. We depict the flow of sensor data through the CAM system, showing the various memory buffers, temporary disk storage and mechanisms to permanently store the data in HDF5 format on the network attached storage (NAS).
 
poster icon Poster WEPGF065 [1.229 MB]  
 
WEPGF068 Formalizing Expert Knowledge in order to Analyse CERN's Control Systems controls, data-analysis, software, operation 1
 
  • A. Voitier, M. Gonzalez-Berges, F.M. Tilaro
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • M. Roshchin
    Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, München, Germany
 
  The automation infrastructure needed to reliably run CERN's accelerator complex and its experiments produces large and diverse amounts of data, besides physics data. Over 600 industrial control systems with about 45 million parameters store more than 100 terabytes of data per year. At the same time a large technical expertise in this domain is collected and formalized. The study is based on a set of use cases classified into three data analytics domains applicable to CERN's control systems: online monitoring, fault diagnosis and engineering support. A known root cause analysis concerning gas system alarms flooding was reproduced with Siemens' Smart Data technologies and its results were compared with a previous analysis. The new solution has been put in place as a tool supporting operators during breakdowns in a live production system. The effectiveness of this deployment suggests that these technologies can be applied to more cases. The intended goals would be to increase CERN's systems reliability and reduce analysis efforts from weeks to hours. It also ensures a more consistent approach for these analyses by harvesting a central expert knowledge base available at all times.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF068 [1.468 MB]  
 
WEPGF116 PvaPy: Python API for EPICS PV Access EPICS, software, interface, framework 1
 
  • S. Veseli
    ANL, Argonne, Ilinois, USA
 
  As the number of sites deploying and adopting EPICS Version 4 grows, so does the need to support PV Access from multiple languages. Especially important are the widely used scripting languages that tend to reduce both software development time and the learning curve for new users. In this paper we describe PvaPy, a Python API for the EPICS PV Access protocol and its accompanying structured data API. Rather than implementing the protocol itself in Python, PvaPy wraps the existing EPICS Version 4 C++ libraries using the Boost. Python framework. This approach allows us to benefit from the existing code base and functionality, and to significantly reduce the Python API development effort. PvaPy objects are based on Python dictionaries and provide users with the ability to access even the most complex of PV Data structures in a relatively straightforward way. Its interfaces are easy to use, and include support for advanced EPICS Version 4 features such as implementation of client and server Remote Procedure Calls (RPC).  
poster icon Poster WEPGF116 [0.738 MB]  
 
WEPGF141 Tools and Procedures for High Quality Technical Infrastructure Monitoring reference Data at CERN database, controls, interface, framework 1
 
  • R. Martini, M. Bräger, J.L. Salmon, A. Suwalska
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  The monitoring of the technical infrastructure at CERN relies on the quality of the definition of numerous and heterogeneous data sources. In 2006, we introduced the MoDESTI procedure for the Technical Infrastructure Monitoring (TIM) system to promote data quality. The first step in the data integration process is the standardisation of the declaration of the various data points whether these are alarms, equipment statuses or analogue measurement values. Users declare their data points and can follow their requests, monitoring personnel ensure the infrastructure is adapted to the new data, and control room operators check that the data points are defined in a consistent and intelligible way. Furthermore, rigorous validations are carried out on input data to ensure correctness as well as optimal integration with other computer systems at CERN (maintenance management, geographical viewing tools etc.). We are now redesigning the MoDESTI procedure in order to provide an intuitive and streamlined Web based tool for managing data definition, as well as reducing the time between data point integration requests and implementation. Additionally, we are introducing a Class-Device-Property data definition model, a standard in the CERN accelerator sector, for a more flexible use of the TIM data points.
MoDESTI : Monitoring Data Entry System for the Technical Infrastructure.
TIM : Technical Infrastructure Monitoring.
 
poster icon Poster WEPGF141 [0.512 MB]  
 
WEPGF147 ALICE Monitoring in 3-D detector, controls, experiment, software 1
 
  • O. Pinazza
    INFN-Bologna, Bologna, Italy
  • A. Augustinus, P.M. Bond, P.Ch. Chochula, M. Lechman, J. Niedziela
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • A.N. Kurepin
    RAS/INR, Moscow, Russia
 
  The ALICE experiment is a complex hardware and software device, monitored and operated with a control system based on WinCC OA. ALICE is composed of 19 detectors and installed in a cavern along the LHC at CERN; each detector is a set of modular elements, assembled in a hierarchical model called Finite State Machine. A 3-D model of the ALICE detector has been realized, where all elements of the FSM are represented in their relative location, giving an immediate overview of the status of the detector. For its simplicity, it can be a useful tool for the training of operators. The development is done using WinCC OA integrated with the JCOP fw3DViewer, based on the AliRoot geometry settings. Extraction and conversion of geometry data from AliRoot requires the usage of conversion libraries, which are currently being implemented. A preliminary version of ALICE 3-D is now deployed on the operator panel in the ALICE Run Control Centre. In the next future, the 3-D panel will be available on a big touch screen in the ALICE Visits Centre, providing visitors with the unique experience of navigating the experiment from both inside and out.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF147 [1.272 MB]  
 
WEPGF155 Improving Software Services Through Diagnostic and Monitoring Capabilities controls, software, diagnostics, operation 1
 
  • P. Charrue, M. Buttner, F. Ehm, P. Jurcso
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  CERN's Accelerator Controls System is built upon a large set of software services which are vital for daily operations. It is important to instrument these services with sufficient diagnostic and monitoring capabilities to reduce the time to locate a problem and to enable pre-failure detection by surveillance of process internal information. The main challenges here are the diversity of programs (C/C++ and Java) , real-time constraints, the distributed environment and diskless systems. This paper describes which building blocks have been developed to collect process metrics and logs, software deployment and release information and how equipment/software experts today have simple and time-saving access to them using the DIAMON console. This includes the possibility to remotely inspect the process (build-time, version, start time, counters,..) and change its log levels for more detailed information.  
 
THHC3O01 The MeerKAT Graphical User Interface Technology Stack interface, controls, GUI, framework 1
 
  • M. Alberts, F. Joubert
    SKA South Africa, National Research Foundation of South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa
 
  Funding: SKA South Africa National Research Foundation of South Africa Department of Science and Technology 3rd floor, The Park Park Road Pinelands ZA - Cape Town 7405 +27 21 506 7300
The South African MeerKAT radio telescope, currently being built some 90 km outside the small Northern Cape town of Carnarvon, is a precursor to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope and will be integrated into the mid-frequency component of SKA Phase 1. Providing the graphical user interface (GUI) for MeerKAT required a reassessment of currently employed technologies with a strong focus on leveraging modern user interface technologies and design techniques. An extensive investigation was performed to evaluate and assess potential GUI technologies and frameworks. The result of this investigative study identified a responsive web application for the frontend and asynchronous web server for the backend. In particular the AngularJS framework used in combination with Material Design principles, Websockets and other popular javascript layout and imaging libraries, such as D3.js, proved an ideal fit for the requirements of the MeerKAT GUI frontend. This paper will provide a summary of the user interface technology investigation and further expound on the whole technology stack adopted to provide a modern user interface with real time capabilities.
 
slides icon Slides THHC3O01 [10.201 MB]  
 
THHD3O05 Standards-Based Open-Source PLC Diagnostics Monitoring PLC, diagnostics, status, controls 1
 
  • B. Copy, H. Milcent, M.Z. Zimny
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  PLCs are widely used to control and monitor industrial processes at CERN. Since these PLCs fulfill critical functions, they must be placed under permanent monitoring. However, due to their proprietary architecture, it is difficult to both monitor the status of these PLCs using vendor-provided software packages and integrate the resulting data with the CERN accelerator infrastructure, which itself relies on CERN-specific protocols. This paper describes the architecture of a stand-alone "PLC diagnostics monitoring" Linux daemon which provides live diagnostics information through standard means and protocols (file logging, CERN protocols, Java Monitoring Extensions). This information is currently consumed by the supervision software which is used by the standby service to monitor the status of critical industrial applications in the LHC and by the monitoring console used by the LHC operators. Both applications are intensively used to monitor and diagnose critical PLC hardware running all over CERN.  
slides icon Slides THHD3O05 [1.053 MB]  
 
THHD3O06 Overview of the Monitoring Data Archive used on MeerKAT database, interface, status, GUI 1
 
  • M.J. Slabber
    SKA South Africa, National Research Foundation of South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa
 
  Funding: SKA South Africa National Research Foundation of South Africa Department of Science and Technology.
MeerKAT, the 64-receptor radio telescope being built in the Karoo, South Africa, by Square Kilometre Array South Africa (SKA SA), comprises a large number of components. All components are interfaced to the Control and Monitoring (CAM) system via the Karoo Array Telescope Communication Protocol (KATCP). KATCP is used extensively for internal communications between CAM components and other subsystems. A KATCP interface exposes requests and sensors. Sampling strategies are set on sensors, ranging from several updates per second to infrequent updates. The sensor samples are of multiple types, from small integers to text fields. As the various components react to user input and sensor samples, the samples with timestamps need to be permanently stored and made available for scientists, engineers and operators to query and analyse. This paper present how the storage infrastructure (dubbed Katstore) manages the volume, velocity and variety of this data. Katstore is comprised of several stages of data collection and transportation. The stages move the data from monitoring nodes to storage node to permanent storage to offsite storage. Additional information (e.g. type, description, units) about each sensor is stored with the samples.
 
slides icon Slides THHD3O06 [29.046 MB]  
 
FRA3O01 Past, Present and Future of the ASKAP Monitoring and Control System controls, software, EPICS, hardware 1
 
  • M. Marquarding
    CASS, Epping, Australia
 
  The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) is CSIRO's new radio telescope currently under construction and commissioning at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in the Mid West region of Western Australia. The first six antennas equipped with the first generation (or Mark-I) Phased Array Feeds (PAF) have been in commissioning since 2013. Twelve of the second generation (Mark-II) PAFs are expected to hit the ground late this year leading into the start of the Early Science program. This paper will present the current status of the ASKAP project, including some exciting results coming from the commissioning activities. This will encompass the status of the monitoring and control system, named the Telescope Operating System (TOS), future developments and some of the lessons learned during the early stages of the integration and commissioning phase.