Keyword: radiation
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MOC3O01 Comprehensive Fill Pattern Control Engine: Key to Top-Up Operation Quality injection, controls, operation, experiment 1
 
  • T. Birke, F. Falkenstern, R. Müller, A. Schälicke
    HZB, Berlin, Germany
 
  Funding: Work supported by BMBF and Land Berlin.
At the light source BESSY II numerous experiments as well as machine development studies benefit from a very flexible and stable fill pattern: standard operation mode comprises a multibunch train for the average users, a purity controlled high current camshaft bunch in a variable length ion clearing gap for pump/probe experiments and a mechanical pulse picking chopper, three high current bunches for femto second slicing opposite to the gap and a specific bunch close to the end of the ion clearing gap for resonant excitation pulse picking. The fill pattern generator and control software is based on a state machine. It controls the full chain from gun timing, linac pulse trains, injection and extraction elements as well as next shot predictions allowing triggering the next DAQ cycle. Architecture and interplay of the software components as well as implemented functionality with respect to hardware control, performance surveillance and reasoning of next actions, radiation protection requirements are described.
 
slides icon Slides MOC3O01 [3.687 MB]  
 
MOPGF112 Measurements, Alarms and Interlocks in the Vacuum Control System of the LHC vacuum, electronics, interlocks, controls 1
 
  • G. Pigny, F. Antoniotti, J-P. Boivin, N. Chatzigeorgiou, J. Gama, P. Gomes, P. Krakówski, H.F. Pereira
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  In the LHC beam pipes and cryostats, the pressure measurement covers a wide range, from 1500 mbar down to 10-11 mbar and even lower. If vacuum deteriorates, alarm signals are generated and sent to other systems, e.g. cryogenics, accelerating cavities, kicker magnets, and beam interlock. In addition, an unacceptable pressure rise in beam pipes generates interlocks to close the adjacent sector valves, thus isolating the sector, so that the pressure rise does not propagate. This paper describes the measurement chains, the alarms and interlocks logic used in the vacuum control system of the LHC. We analyze the possible signal degradation caused by ionizing radiation or due to cable length, shielding and grounding. The weaknesses of the existing vacuum measurement system are pointed out, and a prospective for improvement of the conditioning electronics is proposed. During the first LHC long shut down, several corrections were applied; the results of the tests after commissioning are also presented.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF112 [1.725 MB]  
 
MOPGF121 Stripping Foil Displacement Unit Control for H Injection in PSB at CERN vacuum, controls, linac, PLC 1
 
  • P. Van Trappen, R. Noulibos, W.J.M. Weterings
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  For CERN's Linac4 (L4) Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) injection scheme, slices of the 160 MeV H beam will be distributed to the 4 superposed synchrotron rings of the PSB. The beam will then be injected horizontally into the PSB by means of an H charge-exchange injection system using a graphite stripping foil to strip the electrons from the H ions. The foil and its positioning mechanism will be housed under vacuum inside a stripping foil unit, containing a set of six foils that can be mechanically rotated into the beam aperture. The band with mounted foils is controlled by a stepping motor while a resolver, micro-switches and a membrane potentiometer provide foil position feedback. The vicinity of the ionizing beam and vacuum requirements have constrained the selection of the above mentioned control system parts. The positioning and interlocking logic is implemented in an industrial Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). This paper describes the design of the stripping foil unit electronics and controls and presents the first results obtained from a test bench unit which will be installed in the Linac4 transfer line by the end of the 2015 for foil tests with beam.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF121 [3.080 MB]  
 
MOPGF142 Development of a Network-based Personal Dosimetry System, KURAMA-micro network, monitoring, operation, detector 1
 
  • M. Tanigaki
    Kyoto University, Research Reactor Institute, Osaka, Japan
  • Y. Nakanishi
    Shikoku Research Institute Inc., Kagawa, Japan
 
  As the recovery from the nuclear accident in Fukushima progresses, strong demands arise on the continuous monitoring of individual radiation exposure based on action histories in a large group, such as the residents returning to their hometown after decontamination, or the workers involved in the decomissioning of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. KURAMA-micro, a personal dosimetry system with network and positioning capability, is developed for such purpose. KURAMA-micro consists of a semiconductor dosimeter and a DAQ board based on OpenATOMS. Each unit records radiation data tagged with their measurement time and locations, and uploads the data to the server over a ZigBee-based network once each unit comes near one of the access points prepared expected activities range of users. Location data are basically obtained by a GPS unit, and an additional radio beacon scheme using ZigBee broadcast protocol is also used for the indoor positioning. The development of a proto-type KURAMA-micro is finished and a field test for the workers of a nuclear reactor under normal operation is planned in the spring of 2015.  
 
MOPGF171 Active Magnetic Bearings System Upgrade for LHC Cryogenic Cold Compressor, Radiations Mitigation Project (R2E) controls, operation, hardware, software 1
 
  • M. Pezzetti
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
  • P. Arpaia
    Naples University Federico II, Science and Technology Pole, Napoli, Italy
  • M. Girone
    U. Sannio, Benevento, Italy
  • M. Hubatka
    MECOS AG, Winterthur, Switzerland
 
  During the normal operation of the Large Hadron Collider, the high hadron flux level induced several Single Event Errors (SEE failure caused by a particle passing through) to the standard electronics installed. Such events perturbed LHC normal operation. As a consequence, a mitigation plan to minimise radiation-induced failures and optimise LHC operation was started: R2E mitigation project. This paper will deal with the mitigation problem for LHC/P8 equipment and the main improvements for the equipment in P4, with special focus on the controllers for the Active Magnetic Bearings used in the IHI-LINDE cold compressors. In addition, a new approach based on frequency response analysis to assess the cold compressor mechanical quality will be presented. The hardware and software design, implemented to increase the global reliability of the system, will be highlighted. A corresponding experiment protocol was developed at CERN in collaboration with the MECOS Company and the Universities of Sannio and Napoli Federico II. Preliminary experimental results showing the performance of the proposed approach on a case study for the cold compressor in P4 will be finally reported.  
 
TUC3O07 Safety Integrity Level (SIL) Verification for SLAC Radiation Safety Systems controls, PLC, electronics, operation 1
 
  • F. Tao, E. Carrone, J.M. Murphy, K.T. Turner
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
 
  SIL is a key concept in functional safety standards: it is a performance measure on how reliable is a safety system performing a particular safety function. In the system design stage, SIL verification must be performed to prove that the SIL achieved meets/exceeds the SIL assigned during risk assessment, to comply with standards. Unlike industrial applications, where safety systems are usually composed of certified devices or devices with long usage history, safety systems in large physics laboratories are less standardized and more complex in terms of system architecture and devices used. In addition, custom designed electronics are often employed, with limited reliability information. Verifying SIL for these systems requires in-depth knowledge of reliability evaluation. In this paper, it is demonstrated how to determine SIL using SLAC radiation safety systems (Personnel Protection System (PPS) and Beam Containment System (BCS)) as examples. PPS utilizes commercial safety rated devices, while BCS also contains customized electronics. Choice of standards, methods of evaluation, reliability data gathering process (both from industry and from hardware development) are also discussed.  
slides icon Slides TUC3O07 [1.754 MB]  
 
TUD3O03 REMUS: The new CERN Radiation and Environment Monitoring Unified Supervision monitoring, database, interface, operation 1
 
  • A. Ledeul, G. Segura, R.P.I. Silvola, B. Styczen, D. Vasques Ribeira
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  The CERN Health, Safety and Environment Unit is mandated to provide a Radiation and Environment Monitoring SCADA system for all CERN accelerators, experiments as well as the environment. In order to face the increasing demand of radiation protection and continuously assess both the conventional and the radiological impact on the environment, CERN is developing and progressively deploying its new supervisory system, called REMUS - Radiation and Environment Monitoring Unified Supervision. This new WinCC OA based system aims for an optimum flexibility and scalability, based on the experience acquired during the development and operation of the previous CERN radiation and environment supervisory systems (RAMSES and ARCON). REMUS will interface with more than 70 device types, providing about 3,000 measurement channels (approximately 500,000 tags) by end 2016. This paper describes the architecture of the system, as well as the innovative design that was adopted in order to face the challenges of heterogeneous equipment interfacing, diversity of end users and non-stop operation.  
slides icon Slides TUD3O03 [2.213 MB]  
 
WEM305 LabVIEW Interface for MADOCA II with Key-Value Stores in Messages LabView, interface, controls, synchrotron-radiation 1
 
  • T. Matsumoto, Y. Furukawa, Y. Hamada, T. Matsushita
    JASRI/SPring-8, Hyogo-ken, Japan
 
  MADOCA II is a next generation of the Message And Database Oriented Control Architecture (MADOCA) and a message driven distributed control framework as in MADOCA, but several functions such as control on Windows and messaging with variable-length data were implemented by using ZeroMQ. A prototype of LabVIEW interface was also developed with a VI library of ZeroMQ and implemented into our control system at SPring-8 since 2013, as presented at last ICALEPCS meeting. However, it is recognized that the interface should be very easy to use to be spread for wide LabVIEW usage. In this paper, a new redesigned LabVIEW interface is presented. In the new interface, messages and variable-length data such as image data can be managed with key-value stores. Applications for client program and equipment management server can be easily constructed. The VIs are based on a dynamic link library (DLL) developed using C++ language. Therefore, the upgrade on the interface is easily carried out with the replacement of DLL. The DLL can be also used from other languages such as Python and C++. The adoption of a new LabVIEW interface into our facility such as control of experimental stations is planned.  
slides icon Slides WEM305 [0.652 MB]  
poster icon Poster WEM305 [0.790 MB]  
 
THHB2O02 A Modular Approach to Acquisition Systems for Future CERN Beam Instrumentation Developments FPGA, instrumentation, timing, interface 1
 
  • A. Boccardi, M. Barros Marin, T.E. Levens, W. Viganò, C. Zamantzas
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  This paper will present the new modular architecture adopted as a baseline by the CERN Beam Instrumentation Group for its future acquisition system developments. The main blocks of this architecture are: radiation tolerant digital front-ends; a latency deterministic multi gigabit optical link; a high pin count FMC carrier used as a VME-based back-end for data concentration and processing. Details will be given on the design criteria for each of these modules as well as examples of their use in systems currently being developed at CERN.  
slides icon Slides THHB2O02 [2.051 MB]