Keyword: simulation
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MOC3O06 The Laser Megajoule Facility: The Computational System PARC laser, software, experiment, interface 1
 
  • S. Vermersch
    CEA, LE BARP cedex, France
 
  The Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) is a 176-beam laser facility, located at the CEA CESTA Laboratory near Bordeaux (France). It is designed to deliver about 1.4 MJ of energy to targets, for high energy density physics experiments, including fusion experiments. The assembly of the first line of amplification (8 beams) was achieved in October 2014. A computational system, PARC has been developed and is under deployment to automate the laser setup process, and accurately predicts the laser energy and temporal shape. PARC is based on the computer simulation code MIRO. For each LMJ shot, PARC determines the characteristics of the laser injection system required to achieve the desired main laser output, provide parameter checking needed for all equipment protections, determines the required diagnostic setup, and supplies post-shot data analysis and reporting. This paper presents the first results provided by PARC. It also describe results obtained with the PARC demonstrator during the first experiments conducted on the LMJ facility.  
slides icon Slides MOC3O06 [4.980 MB]  
 
MOPGF092 Integration of the TRACK Beam Dynamics Model to Decrease LINAC Tuning Times controls, emittance, database, real-time 1
 
  • C.E. Peters, C. Dickerson, F. Garcia, M.A. Power
    ANL, Argonne, Illinois, USA
 
  Funding: This work is supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.  This research used resources of ANLs ATLAS facility, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility
The Accelerator R&D Group within the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Physics Division maintains a beam dynamics model named TRACK. This simulation code has the potential to assist operators in visualizing key performance parameters of the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerating System (ATLAS). By having real-time access to visual and animated models of the particle beam transverse and longitudinal phase spaces, operators can more quickly iterate to a final machine tune. However, this effort requires a seamless integration into the control system, both to extract initial run-time information from the accelerator, and to present the simulation results back to the users. This paper presents efforts to pre-process, batch execute, and visualize TRACK particle beam physics simulations in real-time via the ATLAS Control System.
 
poster icon Poster MOPGF092 [2.199 MB]  
 
MOPGF129 Understanding the Failure Characteristics of the Beam Permit System of RHIC at BNL collider, ion, kicker, controls 1
 
  • P. Chitnis, T.G. Robertazzi
    Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, USA
  • K.A. Brown
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy.
The RHIC Beam Permit System (BPS) monitors the anomalies occurring in the collider and restores the machine to a safe state upon fault detection. The reliability of the BPS thus directly impacts RHIC availability. An analytical multistate reliability model of the BPS has been developed to understand the failure development and propagation over store length variation. BPS has a modular structure. The individual modules have joint survival distributions defined by competing risks with exponential lifetimes. Modules differ in functionality and input response. The overall complex behavior of the system is analyzed by first principles for different failure/success states of the system. The model structure changes according to the type of scenario. The analytical model yields the marginal survival distribution for each scenario versus different store lengths. Analysis of structural importance and interdependencies of modules is also examined. A former Monte Carlo model* is used for the verification of the analytical model for a certain store length. This work is next step towards building knowledge base for eRHIC design by understanding finer failure characteristics of the BPS.
*P. Chitnis et al., 'A Monte Carlo Simulation Approach to the Reliability Modeling of the Beam Permit System of Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL', Proc. ICALEPCS'13, San Francisco, CA.
 
poster icon Poster MOPGF129 [1.326 MB]  
 
MOPGF175 A Unified Approach to the Design of Orbit Feedback with Fast and Slow Correctors controls, electron, storage-ring, feedback 1
 
  • S. Gayadeen, M.T. Heron, G. Rehm
    DLS, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
 
  A unified control design is proposed to simultaneously determine control actions for both fast and slow arrays of correctors used for orbit feedback. By determining the interaction of the spatial subspaces of each array of correctors, spatial modes which require both fast and slow correctors can be identified. For these modes, a mid-ranging control technique is proposed to systematically allocate control action for each corrector. The mid-ranging control technique exploits the different dynamic characteristics of the correctors to ensure that the two arrays of actuators work together and avoid saturation of the fast correctors. Simulation results for the Diamond Storage Ring are presented.  
poster icon Poster MOPGF175 [0.995 MB]  
 
TUD3O04 The Virtual European XFEL Accelerator software, hardware, controls, operation 1
 
  • R. Kammering, W. Decking, L. Fröhlich, O. Hensler, T. Limberg, S.M. Meykopff, K.R. Rehlich, V. Rybnikov, J. Wilgen, T. Wilksen
    DESY, Hamburg, Germany
 
  The ambitious commissioning plans for the European XFEL require that many of the high-level controls are ready from the beginning. The idea arose to create a virtual environment to carry out such developments and tests in advance, to test interfaces, software in general and the visualisation of the variety of components. Based on the experiences and on the systems that are already in operation at the FLASH facility for several years, such a virtual environment is being created. The system can already simulate most of the key components of the upcoming accelerator. Core of the system is an event synchronized data acquisition system (DAQ). The interfaces of the DAQ system towards the device level, as well as to the high-level side is utilising the same software stack as the production system does. Thus, the software can be developed and used interchangeably between the virtual and the real machine. This allows to test concepts, interfaces and identify problems and errors at an early stage. In this paper the opportunities arising from the operation of such a virtual machine will be presented. The limits in terms of the resulting complexity and physical relationships will also be shown.  
slides icon Slides TUD3O04 [3.225 MB]  
 
WEPGF025 Data Driven Simulation Framework framework, controls, software, hardware 1
 
  • S. Roy Chaudhuri, A.S. Banerjee, P. Patwari
    Tata Research Development and Design Centre, Pune, India
  • L. Van den Heever
    SKA South Africa, National Research Foundation of South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa
 
  Funding: Tata Research Development and Design Centre, TCSL.
Control systems for Radio Astronomy projects such as MeerKAT* require testing functionality of different parts of the Telescope even when the system is not fully developed. Usage of software simulators in such scenarios is customary. Projects build simulators for subsystems such as Dishes, Beamformers and so on to ensure the correctness of a) their interface to the control system b) logic written to coordinate and configure them. However, such simulators are developed as one-offs, even when they implement similar functionality. This leads to duplicated effort impacting large projects such as Square Kilometer Array**. We leverage the idea of data driven software development and conceptualize a simulation framework that reduces the simulator development effort, to mitigate this: 1) capturing all the necessary information through instantiation of a well-defined simulation specification model, 2) configuring a reusable engine that performs the required simulation functions based on the instantiated and populated model provided to it as input. The results of a PoC for such a simulation framework implemented in the context of Giant Meter-wave Radio Telescope*** are presented.
*MeerKAT CAM Design Description, DNo M1500-0000-006, Rev 2, July 2014**A.R. Taylor, "The Square Kilometre Array", Proceedings IAU Symposium, 2012***www.gmrt.ncra.tifr.res.in
 
poster icon Poster WEPGF025 [0.672 MB]  
 
WEPGF031 The Evolution of the Simulation Environment in ALMA software, network, hardware, operation 1
 
  • T.C. Shen, S.A. Fuica, A. Ovando, N. Saez, R. Soto, T.I. Staig, G. Velez
    ALMA Observatory, Santiago, Chile
  • J.P.A. Ibsen
    ESO, Santiago, Chile
 
  The Atacama Large Millimeter /sub millimeter Array (ALMA) has entered into operation phase since 2014. This transition changed the priorities within the observatory, in which, most of the available time will be dedicated to science observations at the expense of technical time that software testing used to have available in abundance. The scarcity of the technical time surfaces one of the weakest points in the existent infrastructure available for software testing: the simulation environment of the ALMA software. The existent simulation focuses on the functionality aspect but not on the real operation scenarios with all the antennas. Therefore, scalability and performance problems introduced by new features or hidden in the current accepted software cannot be verified until the actual problem explodes during operation. Therefore, it was planned to design and implement a new simulation environment, which must be comparable, or at least, be representative of the production environment. In this paper we will review experiences gained and lessons learnt during the design and implementation of the new simulated environment.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF031 [1.398 MB]  
 
WEPGF083 Single Neutron Counting Using CCD and CMOS Cameras neutron, detector, electron, background 1
 
  • P. Mutti, M. Plaz, E. Ruiz-Martinez, P. Van Esch
    ILL, Grenoble, France
  • M. Crisanti
    Università degli di Perugia, Perugia, Italy
 
  Neutron detection traditionally takes place with detectors based upon particle detection technologies like gas or scintillation detections. These detectors have a high dynamic range, and are very performing at low counting rates and fast timing (time of flight) applications. At high counting rates however, continuous imaging detectors such as CCD or CMOS camera's optically linked to scintillators, can have very good performances concerning linearity and spatial resolution but the dynamic range of these systems is limited by noise and gamma background. We explore a technique that allows us to use imaging detectors as counting detectors at lower counting rates, and transits smoothly to continuous imaging at higher rates. Neutron detection involves reactions releasing energies of the order of the MeV, while X-ray detection releases energies of the order of the photon energy, (10 KeV range). This 100-fold higher energy allows the individual neutron detection light signal to be significantly above the noise level, as such allowing for discrimination and individual counting. The theory is next confronted with experimental measurements on CCD and CMOS type commercial cameras.  
poster icon Poster WEPGF083 [7.975 MB]  
 
THHB2O03 The Global Trigger with Online Vertex Fitting for Low Energy Neutrino Research experiment, electronics, detector, photon 1
 
  • G.H. Gong, H. Li, T. Xue
    Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of China
  • H. Gong
    TUB, Beijing, People's Republic of China
 
  Neutrino research is of great importance for particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology, the JUNO (Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory) is a multi-purpose neutrino experiment for neutrino mass ordering determination and precision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters. A brand new global trigger scheme with online vertex fitting has been proposed, aiming at the ultra-low anti-neutrino energy threshold as down to 0.1MeV which is essential for the study of solar neutrino and elastic scattering of neutrinos on supernova burst. With this scheme, the TOF (time of flight) difference of photons fly through the liquid media from the interaction point to the surface of central detector can be corrected online with real time, the width of trigger window to cover the whole period of a specific neutrino generated photons can be significantly reduced which lessen the integrated dark noise introduced from the large amount of PMT devices hence a lower energy threshold can be achieved. The scheme is compatible, flexible and easy to implement, it can effectively extend the physics potential of the JUNO for low energy neutrino research topics.  
slides icon Slides THHB2O03 [4.252 MB]