Keyword: superconducting-magnet
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MOM310 Nonlinear System Identification of Superconducting Magnets of RHIC at BNL diagnostics, real-time, dipole, database 1
 
  • P. Chitnis
    Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, USA
  • K.A. Brown
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
 
  Funding: Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy.
The Quench Detection System (QDS) of RHIC detects the Superconducting (SC) magnet quenches by voltage sensing. The real-time voltage across the SC magnet is compared with a predicted voltage from a behavioral model, a deviation from which triggers the quench event and energy extraction. Due to the limitations of the magnet model, many false quench events are generated that affect the RHIC availability. This work is targeted towards remodeling the magnets through nonlinear system identification for the improvement in QDS reliability. The nonlinear electrical behavior of the SC magnets is investigated by statistical data analysis of magnet current and voltage signals. Many data cleaning techniques are employed to reduce the noise in the observed data. Piecewise regression has been used to examine the saturation effects in magnet inductance. The goodness-of-fit of the model is assessed by field testing and comprehensive residual analysis. Finally a new model is suggested for the magnets to be implemented for more accurate results.
 
slides icon Slides MOM310 [0.822 MB]  
poster icon Poster MOM310 [1.028 MB]  
 
TUC3I01 Machine Protection and Interlock System for Large Research Instruments operation, controls, interlocks, extraction 1
 
  • R. Schmidt
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland
 
  Major research instruments such as accelerators and fusion reactors operate with large amount of power and energy stored in beams and superconducting magnets. Highly reliable Machine Protection systems are required to operate such instruments without damaging equipment in case of failure. The increased interest in protection is related to the increasing beam power of high-power proton accelerators such as ISIS, SNS, ESS and the PSI cyclotron, to the large energy stored in the beam (in particular for hadron colliders such as LHC) and to the stored energy in magnet systems such as for ITER and LHC. Machine Protection includes process and equipment monitoring, a system to safely stop operation (e.g. dumping the beam or extracting the energy stored in the magnets) and an interlock system for highly reliable communication between protection systems. Depending on the application, the reaction of the protection function to failures must be very fast (for beam protection systems down to some us). In this paper an overview of the challenges for protection is given, and examples of interlock systems and their use during operation are presented.  
slides icon Slides TUC3I01 [1.883 MB]