WEA3 —  Software technology evolution   (21-Oct-15   09:30—10:15)
Chair: J.C. Guzman, CASS, Epping, Australia
Paper Title Page
WEA3O01 The TANGO Controls Collaboration in 2015 1
 
  • A. Götz, J.M. Chaize, T.M. Coutinho, J.L. Pons, E.T. Taurel, P.V. Verdier
    ESRF, Grenoble, France
  • G. Abeillé
    SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
  • S. Brockhauser, L.J. Fulop
    ELI-ALPS, Szeged, Hungary
  • M.O. Cernaianu
    IFIN-HH, Bucharest - Magurele, Romania
  • I.A. Khokhriakov
    HZG, Geesthacht, Germany
  • R. Smareglia
    INAF-OAT, Trieste, Italy
  • A. Vazquez-Ortero
    ELI-BEAMS, Prague, Czech Republic
 
  This paper presents the latest news from the TANGO collaboration. TANGO is being used in new domains. The three ELI pillars - ELI-Beamlines, ELI-ALPS and ELI-NP in Czech Republic, Hungary and Romania respectively have selected TANGO for many of their control systems. In ELI-Beamlines and ELI-Alps, TANGO will play the role of integrating all the hardware and turn-key systems (some delivered with EPICS or Labview) into one integrated system. In ELI-NP, the HPLS and LBTS will be controlled using TANGO, while the GBS will be controlled using EPICS. On the experimental side, ELI-NP will use both TANGO and EPICS control systems. TANGO will be extended with new features required by the laser community. These features will include nanosecond time-stamping. The latest major release of TANGO V9 includes the following features - data pipes, enumerated types, dynamic commands and forwarded attributes. The collaboration has been extended to include the new members and to provide a sustainable source of resources through collaboration contracts. A new website (http://www.tango-controls.org/) has been designed which improves the communication within the community.  
slides icon Slides WEA3O01 [2.339 MB]  
 
WEA3O02 Recent Advancements and Deployments of EPICS Version 4 1
 
  • G.R. White, M.V. Shankar
    SLAC, Menlo Park, California, USA
  • A. Arkilic, L.R. Dalesio, M.A. Davidsaver, M.R. Kraimer, N. Malitsky, B.S. Martins
    BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York, USA
  • S.M. Hartman, K.-U. Kasemir
    ORNL, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA
  • D.G. Hickin
    DLS, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
  • A.N. Johnson, S. Veseli
    ANL, Argonne, Ilinois, USA
  • T. Korhonen
    ESS, Lund, Sweden
  • R. Lange
    ITER Organization, St. Paul lez Durance, France
  • M. Sekoranja
    Cosylab, Ljubljana, Slovenia
  • G. Shen
    FRIB, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
 
  EPICS version 4 is a set of software modules that add to the base of the EPICS toolkit for advanced control systems. Version 4 adds the possibility of process variable values of structured data, an introspection interface for dynamic typing plus some standard types, high-performance streaming, and a new front-end processing database for managing complex data I/O. A synchronous RPC-style facility has also been added so that the EPICS environment supports service-oriented architecture. We introduce EPICS and the new features of version 4. Then we describe selected deployments, particularly for high-throughput experiment data transport, experiment data management, beam dynamics and infrastructure data.  
slides icon Slides WEA3O02 [2.409 MB]  
 
WEA3O03 Towards Building Reusability in Control Systems - a Journey 1
 
  • P. Patwari, A.S. Banerjee, G. Muralikrishna, S. Roy Chaudhuri
    Tata Research Development and Design Centre, Pune, India
 
  Development of similar systems leads to a strong motivation for reuse. Our involvement with three large experimental physics facilities led us to appreciate this better in the context of development of their respective monitoring and control (M&C) software. We realized that the approach to allowing reuse follows the onion skin model that is, building re-usability in each layer in the solution to the problem. The same motivation led us to create a generic M&C architecture through our first collaborative effort which resulted into a fairly formal M&C domain model. The second collaboration showed us the need to have a common vocabulary that could be used across multiple systems to specify respective domain specific M&C solutions at higher levels of abstraction implemented using the generic underlying M&C engine. This resulted in our definition and creation of a domain specific language for M&C. The third collaboration leads us to imagine capturing domain knowledge using the common vocabulary which will substantially further reuse, this thought is already demonstrated through a preliminary prototype. We discuss our learning through this journey in this paper.  
slides icon Slides WEA3O03 [1.812 MB]